Tag: lubitel

A beautiful young tree showing autumn colour surrounded by long winter dry grass in Ipswich Queensland Australia as captured by Landscape PHotographer Murray Fox using a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film Camera , the Mamiya 45mm Lens and Kodak Ektar 100 film.

Fun with Film 17/06/18

I’ve finally gotten around to getting my first two rolls of colour film developed. Both of these are Kodak Ekatar 100 film. One roll I shot with my Lubitel 166u square format twin lens camera, the other roll I shot with my Mamiya 645 Medium format camera and a variety of lenses.

I used Fotofast in Brisbane for the development, very fast (2 hours) and well priced, best benefit is not too far from home either saving postage costs. Both rolls came out well developed and I think I only underexposed a couple of frames, both on the Lubitel which was before I got my spot meter. All the photos on the Mamiya using the spot meter came out perfect.

It’s certainly a huge learning curve. Not only do you have to get exposure right, but you then have to learn how to scan, how different films react to different light. I’m using an Epson v550 Photo scanner which does both 35mm and 120mm film well.

I’m still working my way through scanning the photos and putting the final touches on them but wanted to share with you what I have captured so far. None of these are earth shattering photos, they are about the learning process, trying different subjects in different light and learning all the steps with an aim towards knowing the whole process inside and out. Only then will I truly start to capture what I think will be very unique and stunning film photographs.

I actually love how this first photo came out. Using the Mamiya and the longest lens I have for it, a 150mm, shooting with the aperture wide open, the shallow depth of field is amazing with medium format. This is something I going to have to explore a lot more of. These lilies are not far from home in a little hidden pond, a nice discovery that I’ll be visiting again for sure.

Water lilies in the pond captured on Kodak Ektar 100 Film using a Mamiya 645 Medium format camera and a Mamiya 150mm lens by Landscape Photographer Murray Fox in Ipswich Queensland Australia
Mamiya 645, Ektar 100, 150mm Lens

This next photograph is my favourite so far from the Lubitel. It shoots in square format which really changes how you end up composing a photograph. I captured this at Governors Lookout near Spicers Gap in the scenic rim of South East Queensland Australia during the photowalk a little while ago. That early morning soft light, the slight imperfections of the camera softening the edges. I really like the feel of this, can’t wait to try it in some mist and fog. Pretty dang good for a $40 medium format camera from Russia!

Beautiful gum trees on a hill, one with the bark splitting from it as the early morning light bathes the bush near Spicers Gap in south east Queensland Australia by Landscape Photographer Murray Fox, captured on Film using a Lubitel 166 universal and Kodak Ektar 100 film.
Lubitel 166 Universal, Kodak Ektar 100.

Next is another Lubitel shot. The light was pretty harsh and I did underexpose this a bit. What it shows is if this film is underexposed, you still capture all the detail perfectly, but a blue cast that is not easy to get rid of can appear across the image. Especially in the shadows. Better to overexpose a touch and really get those wonderful Kodak Ektar colours.

Queens Park in Ipswich Queensland Australia in stunning autumn colour captured with a Lubitel 166 universal camera using Kodak Ektar 100 film by Landscape Photographer Murray Fox.
Lubitel 166u, Kodak Ektar 100

This next photo, shot on the Mamiya, shows what colour you can get when you get the exposure bang on. It also blew me away how narrow the depth of field is with the 150mm when used in close, I’m really going to have to watch that, but it will be fun to use it on the correct scene as well!

A beautiful vibrant colourful bird of paradise flower as captured by Landscape photogapher Murray Fox in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 150mm, Kodak Ektar 100

Finally a photo of what I’m hoping to really use my Mamiya setup for, landscapes! I found this young tree showing some nice colour in a park near home. The golden hour light was falling across enhancing the gold even more. The lack of clouds wasn’t ideal but I do like the contrast of the blue on the gold.

A beautiful young tree showing autumn colour surrounded by long winter dry grass in Ipswich Queensland Australia as captured by Landscape PHotographer Murray Fox using a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film Camera , the Mamiya 45mm Lens and Kodak Ektar 100 film.
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 45mm Lens, Kodak Ektar 100 Film

Let me know in the comments below which is your favourite photo from this weeks post, and if you shoot film, let me know what you are shooting gear and film wise, drop a link to your work, I always love to be inspired by others!

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Lubitel 166 Universal Murray Fox film photography landscape fomapan ektar 200 100 australia queensland

Ramblings – Exploring Film

Over the last year or so I’ve been playing around with film, in black and white which is the cheapest option I’ve found as I can develop at home quite easily.

It’s surprisingly a bit of a learning process. Digital cameras these days make life so much easier. My Olympus has live view in the view finder, will show me under and over exposed areas in real time, with a histogram overlay so getting exposure wrong is pretty much impossible. I’ve shot in RAW format for years which means every photo has to be post processed to bring back the contrast and colour and tweak it to show what I want to represent. I spend more time in front of the computer than behind the camera for sure, and I enjoy that process.

With film I’ve found I have to really slow down. Are my settings correct? Is my exposure right? I’ve had to re-learn measure exposure all over again. Every click of the shutter costs real money so you are double and triple checking every step, and also really considering the photograph, is it worth taking? It’s quite enjoyable and I find the results very rewarding.

I’ve been spending a lot of time looking at photographs I really enjoy, landscapes that inspire me, works that draw me in, and something I’ve discovered is the majority of those photos have been captured on film, and on large film to be precise. My recent trip to visit my family on the Central Coast of NSW saw me drop in to Ken Duncan’s Gallery (again!) and really spend some time viewing and looking at his works. They are printed big, on beautiful hahnemuhle paper, and framed wonderfully. These are the types of photographs I love. And it’s really interesting, you can spot the digital photographs he has taken with his awesome digital medium format cameras a mile away, they are sharp as a tack, amazing detail, but I kept leaning towards the photographs captured on film. They have a bit more glow, are usually a longer exposure, some of the details aren’t quite as sharp, you can see where the exposure had to be nailed to get it right at point of capture. And the colours..film has colours I don’t think digital can reproduce, they are just stunning.

I have two film cameras at the moment. A lovely Olympus Trip 35 point and shoot style 35mm camera that I generally load with black and white and use for street style photography or family snaps. It’s almost set and forget, just pick a focus zone and don’t worry about exposure, it nails it every time, yes, every single time, it’s an amazing piece of kit.

Olympus Trip 35 Film camera Murray Fox Australia Queensland photography
All that stuff around the lens measures the exposure, and powers the camera, no batteries here!

My next camera is a new purchase, a Russian made Lubitel 166 Universal. This is a twin lens reflex (TLR) medium format 120 film camera. It’s extremely simple and extremely manual in use, creates either a 6×6 or 6×4.5cm negative per photo (there is a mask you can change but you are looked into that option for each roll. You look down through the top to work out your composition, and use a little magnifying glass inside to get the focus correct.

 

Lubitel 166 Universal Murray Fox film photography landscape fomapan ektar 200 100 australia queensland
The cheapest medium format camera anywhere in the world, and gives great results when used right!

I’m working my way through a roll of black and white Fomapan 200 creative at the moment with this camera and absolutely loving the process. Working on a tripod (as I always do) getting the composition just right (the view is back to front so it makes you work for it!), measuring the exposure of the scene (I use a simple phone app), putting your settings in, cocking the shutter and then taking the photo. In 2 hours on the weekend I took two shots, total! And I loved it! The whole process of slowing down, really looking at the light of a scene, double checking exposure, framing, settings, and finally committing to the shot is really amazing to me.

My first roll is almost finished and this weekend I’m taking another little step in my film journey and shooting some Ektar 100 colour negative film. This is the modern landscape film of choice. Velvia 50 is what Ken Duncan uses a lot but it’s a lot harder and more expensive to use. The Ektar is very forgiving if you don’t quite get the exposure correctly and gives amazing colour and contrast. I’m really excited to see what results I can get from this film.

Medium format film, scanned in properly, will give a photograph file far larger than anything you can get from any DSLR digital camera, I’m talking hundreds of megapixels of data with a massive range of tones. I can scan a 35mm negative in at around 60mp, I can scan a 6×6 negative in at around 6 times that! The trick I use is I actually use my Olympus OMD Em5 MarkII digital camera, with a macro lens to take a photo of the negative, in hi res mode! Works startling well if you prep everything right.

All of this has me thinking about the next step in my photography. I really want to capture more landscapes with film, and I really want to have the full ability of selective choice in composition. I want big negatives that can give incredibly huge prints, I want the colours and tones that film gives with that beautiful fine grain. And I want bigger than 120 medium format! So now I’m saving, I’m working on getting a 4×5 field View Camera, a modern day version of what Ansel Adams used to use (although he was shooting bigger again with 8×10 I believe). A camera where it’s one shot per film, you need a dark cloth over you and the back of the camera just to compose, but you have the amazing ability to change the lens height, angle, swing for amazing depth of field, or custom focus bands. And a negative that is 4inch x 5inch in size, scanned size? @#%#@ huge!!

So I’m not quitting digital, I love my Olympus and it’ll be with me this weekend. But I’ll have the Lubitel and Olympus Trip with me as well, and they’ll be taking photos in a different way, it will be very interesting to see the results. I think film has a future in my work, some of the results that can be achieved with film are astonishing, and the process of slowing down, the time involved means more investment personally with every photograph taken. I look forward to a hybrid future of digital and analog.

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