Tag: mist

Absolutely amazing colours of dawn over Mt Walker south of Ipswich and Rosewood in South East Queensland Australia by Landscape, Weather and Storm photographer Murray Fox

Chasing Earths Shadow – Mt Walker Dawn

Winter is finally here in Queensland and it’s off to a great start. Temperatures around home have plummeted at night, reaching sub zero and everyone is breaking out the blankets and stoking the fires.

It also means that there is a complete lack of cloud, which, for a landscape photographer, can be rather annoying. However, there are always other options. Anyone seeing any of the sunsets lately would have seen the wonderful deep orange glow across the horizon to the west as the sun dips down. If you turn around, you’ll see wonderful pinks and purples of the reverse sunset that gradually fade as the blue lifts up from the east and night approaches.

This I call earths shadow, and the best part is, it happens at sunrise as well! During the 10-15 minutes before sunrise, the sky to the west will have amazing colour. In fact, you’ll have 360 colour with the shades changing depending on which direction you face.

I headed out this morning hoping the temps had gotten low enough to create some frost around, but the humidity was too high and I would have had to travel several hours further to get the good frosts. That humidity however, created some wonderful fog around the low lying areas. Knowing just he spot that might work for both earths shadow, and fog, I made my way towards Mt Walker.

I’ve photographed an astro photo here previously and with everything looking brown and gold (and in much need of rain!) those purples, pinks and blues turned out to be an amazing contrast to the scene. This was taken around 5 minutes before the sun actually rose, looking south west. To the west of me was much more pink and orange and I’ll be heading out again tomorrow to see if I can get those colours with another great scene.

Captured with my Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, the Olympus 12-40mm Pro lens. I zoomed into 40mm (80mm equivalent on a full frame camera) to compress the scene, bringing Mt Walker closer to the water. I then used a Lee 2 stop hard grad filter to control the brightness in the sky and ensure I captured the colour. Finally I added a polarising filter to cut glare and really make those colours pop.

Absolutely amazing colours of dawn over Mt Walker south of Ipswich and Rosewood in South East Queensland Australia by Landscape, Weather and Storm photographer Murray Fox
ISO 200, f/5.6, 0.5 sec, 2 stop ND Grad, Polariser

I’ve added this photograph to my Landscape Gallery, be sure to check out my other images. I hope to have some film developed and scanned in the next week or so, can’t wait to see the results.

Here is a list of the gear I use. These are affiliate links, by following them and making a purchase you help support my photography at no extra cost to yourself.

* Camera : Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mk II Body Only – Silver
* Canon FD to M43rd Adapter : K&F Concept Lens Mount Adapter for Canon FD Lens to Micro 4/3 Cameras
* My Goto Landscape Lens : Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 12-40mm f2.8 PRO Black Len
* My Favourite Tripod : ZOMEi Z818C Carbon Fiber Camera Tripod With Quick Release Plate and Ball Head (Blue)
* Best Budget Filters Ever : Zomei 10 in 1 Square Z-PRO Series Filter Kit
* Best Budget Portrait Lens Made! : Olympus M.ZUIKO Digital ED 45mm F1.8 (Black) Lens
* The Perfect Walkaround Lens : Panasonic 20mm F/1.7 Pancake Lens
* A great CPL for your 12-40mm : Manfrotto MFESSCPL-62 62 mm Essential Circular Polarizer Filter
* The Best Aftermarket Battery Kit : DSTE 2X BLN-1 Battery + DC133 Travel and Car Charger Adapter

All of my photographs are available for purchase as Fine Art Prints in A2 and A3 size, as well as ready to hang Canvas Prints. Just contact me for pricing.

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A beautiful fog shrouded dawn at Purga south of Ipswich Queensland Australia as the approaching sunrise throws beautiful colours across the rural scene with Ivory Rock in the back drop.

Foggy Purga Dawn

Well is a long weekend here in Queensland so heading out for a nice sunrise seemed on the cards. I had scouted this location using Google Maps, and the angle of light seemed like it would be good. Purga, which is located just south of Ipswich, is a favourite area of mine to shoot. It doesn’t take long to get there, its a nice rural area, and there are some nice peaks to the east that work as a great backdrop from the right vantage point.

This particular spot has two peaks right behind some great leading lines from the track in. I know Purga is also a local fog hot spot but wow, I was not expecting the amount of fog that I encountered this morning, nor how high it went.

I only had one sighting of the peaks, around 40 minutes before sunrise as the early dawn light and colour was pushing through and the fog was sitting just a bit lower. 30 seconds after capturing this first photograph, I lost sight of the peaks and wouldn’t see them again that morning. I zoomed in to fill the frame of this photograph, it also helps to bring all the elements closer to each other, compressing the photograph. The colour here is straight out of camera. I used a 3 stop soft grad filter to lower the brightness of the sky and balance it with the foreground.

A beautiful fog shrouded dawn at Purga south of Ipswich Queensland Australia as the approaching sunrise throws beautiful colours across the rural scene with Ivory Rock in the back drop in this photography by award winning landscape photographer Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark 2, 12-40mm Lens @ 40mm, ISO 200, F/8, 2 seconds

I stuck around for at least 20 minutes after sunrise. I really wanted the sun to break through and put direct light on the foreground. This was never to eventuate. What I did get was some amazing colour lighting up the clouds minutes before sunrise. Switching to wide angle to get as much sky in as possible, I reframed reducing the amount of ground in the photograph. You can see how the fog has moved away from me, but now risen higher around the peaks, blocking their view entirely.

This is a great little spot I’ve found, and there are some nice views south that should really come in handy during the next storm season. I really does pay to explore the back and side roads. I’ll be returning here for sure.

Amazing colourful clouds above the rural landscape at Purga south of Ipswich Queensland Australia in this photograph by award winning Landscape Photographer Murray Fox
12mm, ISO 200, F/8, 1/20 second

I’m progressing with my foray into film photography. I should have a complete setup completed within the next few weeks. I’ll then be working my way through rolls of film and look forward to sharing my results with you.

I really hope you enjoyed this weeks blog post as much as I enjoyed writing it for you. Can I suggest subscribing to my email list to receive occasional Tips, Ideas, News of Prints and Offers.



 

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An absolutely stunning photograph of the rolling hills of Marburg surrounded by fog and amazing sunlight beaming through as views from upon high near Ipswich Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape and Weather Storm Photographer Murray Fox

Fun in the Fog

Its been quite a while since I’ve had a real run and gun photography morning.

My inital plan went completely out the window when I woke up at 4:30am and realised two things. First was the radar was showing lots of cloud off the coast that would block any early light from the sunrise and second, I couldn’t see across the road because of the fog that had developed through the night! Rain the day before and a perfect temperature night mean that huge areas were covered in low lying fog.

I had to formulate a new plan. I now wasn’t worried about getting to a location an hour before sunrise. I was worried the sun would have to get too far into the sky to make it over the clouds at sea before the fog started to lift. My photo from my last blog post had me inspired to try an new perspective on the landscape, from a high vantage point, and I knew just the location. My only concern  was, I’d never been there before! It was near a couple of other spots I did know about so I figured if plan A failed, I had alternatives.

A 30 minute run from home found me making my way along the most incredible ridge line. There is enough room for maybe a house each side of the dirt road, before the land falls away completely down to the valley floor below. What an amazing spot and I’m kicking myself for never being here before. The fog was pooling between the hills in the valleys, absolutely perfectly what I wanted. I tried a few different shots before the sun came up, I really liked this one for the crepuscular rays that were beaming over those annoying high clouds at the coast. Not sure what had gone on with the grass here, kinda wondering if some cows might have been taken by aliens given the “crop circle” in front of me.

Beautiful Crepuscular Rays over the rolling hills of Marburg in Ipswich Queensland as the fog nestles in the valleys, viewed from an amazing height in Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photographer Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm, 1/320 Sec, F/7.1, ISO 200, 2 Stop ND Grad Filter

Want I really wanted however was that sun to break through the clouds and throw some light on the landscape below. I figured if I could keep the sun just out side of the frame I could get a nice angled back lit situation with amazing contrast. Well I didn’t have to wait too long before the sun did finally break through. The unfortunate part was that the beautiful colour wasn’t showing up the way I wanted. So hatching a plan, I decided to really zoom in on the landscape below, isolating the hills and the fog, almost removing the sky, and putting my camera into black and white mode, I can also add a tint. I tried a red/orange tint for warm light but it just didn’t work, going the other way I went with a cool tone (touch of blue) and really liked the results. These settings make no difference to the final photograph as I shoot in Raw and can develop the photograph any way I like. However it really does help you visualise in the field in that moment, what you are shooting for and lets you get your settings just right. This photo took all of 2 minutes to edit, really just convert to black and white, adjust the highlights and shadows to where I wanted them, and then add just a small amount of blue to the shadows in split toning. Done, and this is now one of my most favourite fog photographs ever! Running a print of this today and it’s going straight on the wall. Let me know in the comments below what you think.

An absolutely stunning photograph of the rolling hills of Marburg surrounded by fog and amazing sunlight beaming through as views from upon high near Ipswich Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape and Weather Storm Photographer Murray Fox
1/400 sec, ISO 200, F/8 @ 40mm

Finally finishing up on the ridge line, I knew my morning wasn’t quite over yet. It was time to run and gun. This is really simple. Drive around in amazing light and fog conditions until something grabs your eye, and STOP! If something gets your attention, no matter how small, how trivial, my rule is I have to get out and take a photograph. Well, in the next 40 minutes I stopped 8 times, and got 2 photographs I really liked. That is pure bonus for me as I knew I already had shots in the bag from the morning.

The first one I really liked has a detail that is really hard to see see unless you see the photograph up large, and I like that. It means only a few people will ever see that in person, those that see a print of mine, or who purchase a print. It’s not a dramatic photograph, it’s very simplistic. A tree, in a field, with the sun glowing through the fog behind. The detail I love, all that grass in front, is absolutely littered with circular shaped spider webs glistening with dew! I don’t know what type of spider, I’ll have to look into it because I’ve seen this a few times, but it looks amazing when you realise what it is.

A lone tree sits surrounded by glowing orange sunlight in the early morning fog at Marburg Ipswich Queensland Australia as the foreground is littered with dozens of spider webs glistening with dew by Award winning Australian landscape and weather storm photographer Murray Fox
1/2500 sec, ISO 200, F/8

This next photograph shows why I have that rule of you absolutely positively must stop and take a photograph. I only caught the very briefest of glimpses of this scene as I drove past. In fact I’d driven past it twice already that morning and not noticed it because it was set back quite a distance from the road. Jumping out of the car and grabbing my camera I knew I would need to zoom right in as far as I could for this one, as there didn’t appear to be any way to get closer (tip: I leave my camera mounted to my tripod on the back seat, I don’t have any concerns of it falling off as Olympus gear is just so light, this means I can be out and shooting in 5 seconds, also very handy when chasing storms). The benefit of this zooming in is all the elements of the scene get compressed together. The trees in front get closer to the Tower (as I’m calling it) and the hills behind get closer as well. I think this gives a nice intimate layering for this photograph. The sun was behind me and the colour, light and fog were just amazing.

Stunning beautiful early morning light bathes this rural barn and tower near Marburg Ipswich Queensland Australia as fog surrounds the scene. Captured by award winning Australian Landscape and Weather Storm photographer Murray Fox
1/200 sec, ISO 200, F/8.0

Finally it was time to pack up, what an amazing morning. Autumn is my favourite time of year for photography as there is just so much going on, from late season weather, to fog, to crystal clear nights for Astro, I suggest you get out now and get out often.

I really hope you enjoyed this weeks blog post as much as I enjoyed writing it for you. Can I suggest subscribing to my email list to receive occasional Tips, Ideas, News of Prints and Offers.



 

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Stunning sunrise from Govenors Chair Lookout at Spicers Gap overlooking the Fassifern Valley in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photography Murray Fox

Govenors Chair Sunrise

This morning was a sunrise meet up for the Scenic Rim Photo Walks group and the plan was to shoot sunrise from a fantastic location. Govenors Chair lookout has a stunning view over Mt Greville and the Fassifern valley. The plan was to arrive around an hour before sunrise which was just after 6am. Being around an hours drive from home, my tired brain set my alarm for 4:40am…uh oh. A quick race out and thankfully no traffic, I was just in time for sunrise. The early colour lit the clouds nicely but I was looking for the light after the sun rose.

Fog was nestled in locations throughout the valley, and there was a lovely haze in the air that just lit up with the morning glow of the sun when it broke through the clouds. This first photograph was looking south east, encompasing a wider view and showing the magnificent gradations of light and colour on the landscape, I absolutely love light like this and this photo shows why. Mind the step tho, that is a straight drop off at the end of the rock! You must practice extreme care photographing here.

Stunning sunrise from Govenors Chair Lookout at Spicers Gap overlooking the Fassifern Valley in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photography Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm, ISO 100, F/10, 1/500 Sec, 2 Stop Grad ND Filter

I also had my Lubitel medium format film camera with me. My first go at shooting colour film, I spent a lot of time metering and taking shots of various compositions as the light changed. I’ll have that roll back in a week or so, very excited to see what results I got, hopefully the exposure is okay because the colour should be amazing.

In between taking film shots, I took a more intimate photograph of Mt Greville. This is a beautiful peak from any direction and lies at the southern end of Lake Moogerah. The way the haze was lighting up the mountain, and the layers of the hills below me created beautiful steps of light that lead into the photograph. I composed this in portrait orientation to get as much of the hills below me in the shot while zoomed in a bit to really capture the size of Mt Greville. Let me know in the comments what you think of this photograph.

Mt Greville in the Scenic Rim of South East Queensland Australia at sunrise, viewed from Govenors Chair Lookout at Spicers Gap with stunning orange colours and light streaming through the landscape by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photography Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, ISO 100, F/10, 1/800 sec

It was a great morning, lovely to catch up with everyone on the photo walk. They are held monthly, I suggest checking the site out and coming along to a walk if you are in the area, it’s a great way to explore and see things you don’t normally see.

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A beautiful misty and foggy country landscape captured near Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia

When nothing goes to plan, Improvise!

Well sometimes the best laid plans go completely array. When it comes to landscape photography this can happen more often than not, that’s the way of mother nature. There is a very photogenic mountain peak south of where I live. I had worked out a location I wanted to shoot from, and I was going to experiment using a long lens (in the realms of 140-200mm) to see what compositions I could get.

To get there an hour before sunrise I had to leave home at 3am for the 1.5 hour drive south. As soon as I left home I knew something wasn’t right. It has been raining, and I couldn’t see clouds or stars. A low cloud layer was blanketing the area. Never one to give up, I kept going, and started driving through intermittent rain and fog. I finally arrived at my location to be greeted with a wall of white.

Well this wasn’t what I was after. I waited over an hour and a half until after sunrise, with the faint hope some sun might break through, or the peak would at least become partially visible. This photo shows the result however, the peak was still buried in the fog. I used a long lens to compress the fence line and bring everything closer.

A fence line stretches across the paddock and into the fog and mist near Boonah Queenland Australia in the Scenic Rim.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, Adapted Canon FD 70-210mm Lens, F/8, 1/100 sec, ISO 2000 handheld

I finally gave up on this location and decided to improvise. I began looking for scenes that caught my eye, ideally with a leading valley through the scene and a main subject to frame. This next photograph is the first one I came across. Again use the adapted long lens I was able to compress the scene, isolating the trees from the rest of the scene. Long lenses are great for when you don’t have an immediate foreground. You can still get a great result and composition, it does take some practice however to find a scene that works. Its an area I’m still learning and will be exploring more for sure.

I focused only on the trees so the background went a little soft as well. I think this one came out quite nicely and just a touch more sun was finally getting through to add some contrast to the ground.

A small Stand of trees stands out against the landscape near Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, Adapted Canon FD 70-210mm F/8, ISO 200, 1/4 sec

The final scene I found called for a lens change, I had a foreground interest nice and close, so I switched to my Olympus 12-40mm pro lens and spent some time framing up a composition. Again the portrait orientation worked, eliminating some clutter from the sides and bringing focus to the dead wood and then the main tree in the photograph. You can see by this time a lot of the fog had cleared, but the low cloud was still incredibly thick. I never did see the mountain on this morning. A return trip is definitely on order as I think it will be an amazing photograph in the right weather and light.

A beautiful misty and foggy country landscape captured near Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, Olympus 12-40mm, ISO 200, 1/50 sec, F/8

I’m still deciding whether the second or third image is my favourite from this day, comment below and let me know which one is yours.

Landscape photography can be very frustrating at times. All the best laid plans, all the pre-visualisation and effort you put into capturing a photograph can come to naught in a very short space of time. It pays to at least be somewhat prepared to seek alternatives if things don’t work out. It could be making sure you carry a few different lenses, having the tripod in the car if you are planning to shoot handheld, or even waiting a few hours to see if anything changes or improves (pro tip, have some food and drink with you always!). This day did not go the way I planned, yet I’m very happy with at least two of the photographs I managed to capture, and now I’ve done a practice run to the location, I know it will be perfect when the light and weather are right. I might not get it next time, but I will get it. Persistence pays.

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Be sure to visit regularly, follow me on Facebook or Twitter where I’ll post links to each new blog post as it happens, also follow me on Instagram where I post up my photographs, and My Story will have lots of behind the scenes photos and videos.

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