Tag: panoramic

A beautiful sunflower in the early morning light. Captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia

Sunflowers

Well a very Happy New Year to you all. For me the start of any new year is a great time not only for a well deserved break, but a great time to reflect on the previous 12 months and have a bit of a mental review of how I saw my photography progress. The main aim of this is to work out my direction for 2019 and I’ve set myself a nice challenge as a result. I’m very happy with how my Astro photography has progressed. My weather photography is in a lull due to simply there being no storms so I’m concentrating on my landscape photography.

I’ve set myself a challenge to only shoot panoramic landscapes in the 3:1 format for 2019. Oh I’ll still get the odd normal 4:3 framed photo, but purely for Instagram. Any dedicated landscape photograph I capture in 2019 is going to be a panorama. Why? Well several reasons. I love to follow other photographers works and over the years I’ve come to admire two photographers in particular. Ken Duncan and Mark Grey, both incredibly successful Australian landscape photographers. Ken has been at it for Decades, Mark is relatively new to the scene, both having extraordinary success. It’s more than that however, it’s the resulting photographs they get. There is something about an amazingly well captured panorama that draws you in. The photograph when seen large envelopes your entire field of view, you are put into the scene with the photographer at the moment of capture.

This is what I want to explore and it actually means relearning a whole lot about photography. Composition is different by necessity as the frame is now very different and balance, viewpoint, elements all come into play in different ways.

So my journey into this field has begun and I find it very exciting. To kick off the new year with a bang I met up with my great friend Craig and we headed west to areas near Toowoomba in search of Sunflowers as word is out, they are blooming.

PLEASE NOTE : I won’t disclose the exact location of this farm at the farmers request. However, if you are looking for Sunflowers the area of Clifton on the Darling Downs between Warwick and Toowoomba has them in flower right now.

Thankfully Craig has scouted this location only the day before, also gaining us permission from the farmer to access the land fully, simply awesome work mate. 3:30am saw us standing in the back of the ute, Tripods at the ready, watching the light slowly appear. This first panorama was captured around 15 minutes before sunrise, the high cloud getting hit with the awesome colours of the approaching sunrise, that light also reflecting down onto the sunflowers. My composition here was to be very simple. Lines leading you through the fields.

An amazing Panorama of Dawn over the Sunflowers near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer Murray Fox
Sunflower Dawn Panorama Available for Purchase as a 40 or 60inch Wide Framed Print/Canvas/Acrylic contact me for further details ref# pano111

Next it was time to really head into the fields. Another section of this farm has a great windmill surrounded by Sunflowers, well how could we resist photographing that? This field was full of bees making their merry way from flower to flower, and we did take the time out here to really just soak up the atmosphere, work our compositions and try different things.

An amazing Panorama of a classing windmill surrounded by sunflowers near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer Murray Fox
Sunflower Windmill Panorama Available for Purchase as a 40 or 60inch Wide Framed Print/Canvas/Acrylic contact me for further details ref# pano112

Capturing panoramas is a bit of a challenge. The hardest part I find is framing. As you are stitching together multiple photographs to take one large one, you can’t see the final result in the field. Specialist panorama cameras exist but are far beyond my budget so this is my option in order to get the best quality and result. So far I’ve worked out that by setting the height of my view and ensuring I capture 5-6 photographs across I can usually get pretty close to the result I’m after with minimal loss of pixels in post production on the computer.

This final panorama was the only time the sun actually fell directly on the flowers. We had stopped to have a chat with the property owner when the sun broke through, but only on the ground, the sky was not being directly affected, awesome light! Excusing myself for a minute, I quickly setup and captured this image of the farmers old parents house, now not lived in but still maintained, which is surrounded by the wonderful sunflowers, not a bad view in my books. I think this is my favourite from the morning and I know my wife agrees with me.

An amazing Panorama of a farmhouse surrounded by sunflowers near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer Murray Fox
Sunflower Farmhouse Panorama Available for Purchase as a 40 or 60inch Wide Framed Print/Canvas/Acrylic contact me for further details ref# pano113

I’ve found I’m quickly falling in love with the panorama format for both the challenge and the results. The quality end result I’m getting allows me to print a 60inch wide x 20inch high photograph at full 300dpi resolution (no loss of quality at all). I love to see my photographs purchased and hanging on peoples walls. Panoramas seem to lend themselves perfectly to being displayed, they work well in many different styles of rooms in peoples homes and in businesses. That’s my end game as a photographer, while I love taking photographs, and sharing them with the world, to create images that people love enough to hang in their own home to me is the ultimate.

So I’ll keep working at it, continuing to find new subjects in amazing conditions and share them with all of you. If I can get a nice portfolio of maybe 20 photographs by the end of 2019 I’ll be in heaven, and maybe a few of you will have such a connection with my work that you’ll want to own a copy for yourselves.

Finally, a quick single photo I took “doing it for the gram”. This will be up on my Instagram Feed.

A beautiful sunflower in the early morning light. Captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia
A beautiful sunflower in the early morning light.

Thank you everyone for following along with my photography for 2018, I really look forward to what 2019 is going to bring. I think the photographs will be released a bit slower, but the quality should be another level higher as I continue to learn and challenge myself.

Murray

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A stunning sunset over Lake Moogerah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia. This panorama shows the beautiful wide view of the dead trees in the water, with Mt Greville looming in the background. The sky is full of colour and the ripples of the water reflects this wonderfully.

Lake Moogerah Sunset Panorama

G’Day everyone. With the family all off to see Mamma Mia the musical, I ended up with a free afternoon. There was a meetup for the Scenic Rim Photo Walks group at Lake Moogerah, so all the gear was packed and off I set for the hours drive south to the dam.

It was a very hot and warm day, many people were taking advantage of the lake with jet skiers and water skiers zipping around. The clouds was starting to look very good as sunset approach, but the wind in the main part of the lake was still very strong, it didn’t look like I was going to get one of those perfect reflections.



I decided to head around to the southern part of the lake as it appeared the wind was a little less strong there. Driving down to the waters edge it looked like I was right, it wasn’t a mirror finish, but the ripples were nice and I figured that if there was colour for sunset, this could work.

I walked the shoreline trying to visualise for a panorama, not something I do often so its a little hard to get your head around. I ended up using my phone to take photos, and then crop them in phone to a rough 3:1 aspect ratio to help work out my composition. There were two stumps close to shore, I liked those and wanted them as my foreground interest. Two sets of taller trees on each side of the mountain could work as a nice framing element. After about 20 minutes of moving around I settled on my spot.

I had my tripod as low as it could go, I also had the camera mounted on a nodal point setup in portrait orientation. This basically allows the camera to rotate around the best part of the lens, so when you get back to stitching together the shots, you have very minimal loss of pixels, worked out great. The hardest part is to make sure your tripod is dead level.

I zoomed in to 34mm on my Olympus 12-40mm pro (equivalent to 68mm on a full frame camera). I wanted to bring all the elements of the scene closer to each other. When you are standing there, that mountain really looms over you and with a wide angle, that feeling would have been lost. I put the camera in full manual mode, ISO at my lowest which is 200, Aperture at F9 which gave me just enough depth of field being zoomed in (take a few test shots and check the sharpness on the back of the camera to get this right). I was also going to bracket my exposures as with such a high peak, using a filter would have darkened it down too much for my liking. My camera is the Olympus OMD, Em5 Mark II.

Now it was just a matter of sitting back and waiting. Sunset here in South East Queensland Australia can be a very funny thing, you will get waves of colours and just when you think it’s all over, another blast comes through. After witnessing at least 2 bursts of colour that didn’t light up the scene well, I thought this may end up a dud sunset, but I knew I something could happen so I just waited.

Suddenly the cloud to the right started getting a hint of red, and within 30 seconds it was glowing. I took my shots from right to left (starting where best colour was). 6 vertical shots overall to capture the width of the scene I wanted, 3 exposures for each shot at metered exposure, 2 stops under and 2 stops over. I ditched the underexposed photos as my metered captured the sky perfectly. Here are the final 12 exposures I would work with.

These are the initial exposures I will use to blend, stitch and then post process to create my Moogerah Sunset Panorama.

The colour finally finished so I made my way back to the day use area to meet back up with the group. I captured a great star trail shot which I’ll share up next week with the details on that one.

Post processing this image was going to be a lot of work and I actually had several goes at it. I finally decided to exposure blend the metered photo and the 2 stop over exposed photo from each shot, to bring back some of the detail in the darker parts of the middle ground. This involved taking both photos into Photoshop and using luminosity masks to blend. I finally ended up with these 6 photos ready for stitching to a panorama and then post processing.

These are the photos I will stitch together and then post process to create my Moogerah Sunset Panorama

Now the post processing begins. I created the panorama in Photoshop and then began my adjustments. I did some colour correction to get the colours to where I remembered them. I then used Nik filters to boost the contrast and colours. A final round of sharpening and I was very happy with the result. The final image ended up at 40inches wide at 300dpi, I’ll certainly be able to print this very big.

A stunning sunset over Lake Moogerah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia. This panorama shows the beautiful wide view of the dead trees in the water, with Mt Greville looming in the background. The sky is full of colour and the ripples of the water reflects this wonderfully.

I really enjoyed the process of capturing this panorama, and I’m starting to learn how to visualise the shot. I’m looking forward to repeating this process more this year, keep an eye out!

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