Tag: queensland

An amazing Broccoli shaped tree with the core of the milky way rising over it, stands tall near Boonah in the scenic rim of Queensland Australia captured by Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox

Broccoli Tree

I first came across this tree several years ago during a 4wd trip. It sits perched on the highest hill of the area, overlooking the valley below to the east. It’s actually two trees that have grown very closely together and become interwined. It’s shape reminds me very much of broccoli, hence the name I’ve given it.

The plan was to capture two photographs this evening. I wanted one with the tree and the core of the milkyway above it, and I thought it might be fun to take an astro selfie, or at least my take on it.

Arriving as the core was getting into position, I started with the selfie. The idea was to setup a remote flash, and stand in between it and the camera, so the flash backlit me. This actually proved harder than I thought, as it was pitch black, and the framing I wanted put me into the sky. I ended up with this shot, my hands are a bit blurred as it was a 15 second exposure I had to hold position for, but I think the effect in the end is great. So, hands up if you love astro photography like I do!

A selfie of Murray Fox under the core of the Milky way near Boonah in the scenic rim of Queensland Australia by Landscape, Weather and Storm Photographer Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5.2, 12-40mm Pro lens, ISO 3200, f/2.8, 15 seconds

I spent the next hour working on capturing a photogaph of the Broccoli tree. This proved a challenge simply due to the width of the tree. I couldn’t get as close as I wanted without cutting of sections and I didn’t want to do a panorama as I was light painting the tree and it would be nigh impossible to blend the shots.

Moving back was the simple answer, I kept the ground as low as possible to get as much of the sky as possible, even then I only ended up with a select part of the core visible.

This is all one exposure. I worked very quickly with my torch, taking care not to blow out any parts of the tree. As a result a bit more noise reduction was required on post than I normally do, but the result came out very nice. As long as you get enough exposure onto the sensor, noise is controllable. I won’t be printing billboards of this photo, but it will print up to A2 size quite nicely. I’ve added this photograph to my Astro Nightscapes galllery.

An amazing Broccoli shaped tree with the core of the milky way rising over it, stands tall near Boonah in the scenic rim of Queensland Australia captured by Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox
ISO 3200, f/2.8, 15 seconds

As astro season continues, I’ll be on the lookout for more interesting and varied subjects to shoot, so please visit weekly and follow me on social media to keep up to date with my latest works.

I really hope you enjoyed this weeks blog post as much as I enjoyed writing it for you. Can I suggest subscribing to my email list to receive occasional Tips, Ideas, News of Prints and Offers.



 

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An amazing view of the core of the milky way rising over a windmill in the rural countryside near Ipswich Queensland Australia as captured by Award winning Landscape storm and weather photographer Murray Fox

Windmill Core

The moon has gone again this weekend and there wasn’t a cloud in the sky for 300ks. The temperature was forecast to be the lowest so far this year (around 5 degrees C in town, more like 2 degrees in the countryside). It looked like a perfect night for some more astro photography. With a slight breeze, everything stayed perfectly dry, no condensation whatsoever.

I caught up with my friend and after packing a few supplies (Picnic chocolate bars and Ice Coffee…yes Ice lol!) we headed out to a location I knew, but had not visited recently. I had word that a new windmill had been erected here and it looked like it was going to be in good alignment with the rising core of the Milkyway. With Mt Walker to the east of it, I thought I could get a really nice backdrop.

Arriving on sight we spent 10 minutes walking around looking at the angles. We noticed that we had a couple of problems to deal with. The first one as the core was not north enough to really put Mt Walker into the framing I wanted with the angle of lens I was using. The big one was the head of the windmill was facing almost due south, making it extremely hard to get a good view of it, and the core.

You can see from this first photograph the layout of the scene and one of my first attempts at seeing what result I could get. Mt Walker is to the left and there just wasn’t a workable angle.

A great view of Mt Walker at night with the core of the milky way rising over a windmill in this pure Australian Night time landscape photograph captured near Ipswich Queensland Australia by Award winning landscape weather storm photographer Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm Pro, F/2.8, 15 seconds, ISO 5000

Never one to give up, and we had a good hour window of shooting before the core was too high in the scene. I kept moving around working angles. Around 80 photos later (and they are all long exposures) I found I really liked this composition. Going vertical to really show the height of the Windmill, the core almost comes blasting out of it. And to top it off there were meteorites regularly dropping across they sky.

The peak of those is next weekend, it was great to see some real fireballs this night. I switched to a 20mm f.17 prime lens for this shot allowing a shorter shutter time (less noise) and a wider aperture (more light). This more zoomed in lens also enlarges the size of the core compared to the foreground, really bringing it into view. This also really captured the colours in the stars. The windmill and ground were illuminated with a torch my friend held to the side of the scene, painting over it with very quick movements. The slight breeze was enough to cause the windmill to turn, and I like the blurring effect during the long exposure, gives a nice sense of movement. The flat top of Mt Walker in the background is just enough in frame here to add some interest and give a sense of location.

An amazing view of the core of the milky way rising over a windmill in the rural countryside near Ipswich Queensland Australia as captured by Award winning Landscape storm and weather photographer Murray Fox
ISO 3200, 8 seconds, 20mm, F/1.7

This photograph has been added to my Astro Nightscapes gallery, really flowing well with my recent captures.

I really hope you enjoyed this weeks blog post as much as I enjoyed writing it for you. Can I suggest subscribing to my email list to receive occasional Tips, Ideas, News of Prints and Offers.



 

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A beautiful fog shrouded dawn at Purga south of Ipswich Queensland Australia as the approaching sunrise throws beautiful colours across the rural scene with Ivory Rock in the back drop.

Foggy Purga Dawn

Well is a long weekend here in Queensland so heading out for a nice sunrise seemed on the cards. I had scouted this location using Google Maps, and the angle of light seemed like it would be good. Purga, which is located just south of Ipswich, is a favourite area of mine to shoot. It doesn’t take long to get there, its a nice rural area, and there are some nice peaks to the east that work as a great backdrop from the right vantage point.

This particular spot has two peaks right behind some great leading lines from the track in. I know Purga is also a local fog hot spot but wow, I was not expecting the amount of fog that I encountered this morning, nor how high it went.

I only had one sighting of the peaks, around 40 minutes before sunrise as the early dawn light and colour was pushing through and the fog was sitting just a bit lower. 30 seconds after capturing this first photograph, I lost sight of the peaks and wouldn’t see them again that morning. I zoomed in to fill the frame of this photograph, it also helps to bring all the elements closer to each other, compressing the photograph. The colour here is straight out of camera. I used a 3 stop soft grad filter to lower the brightness of the sky and balance it with the foreground.

A beautiful fog shrouded dawn at Purga south of Ipswich Queensland Australia as the approaching sunrise throws beautiful colours across the rural scene with Ivory Rock in the back drop in this photography by award winning landscape photographer Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark 2, 12-40mm Lens @ 40mm, ISO 200, F/8, 2 seconds

I stuck around for at least 20 minutes after sunrise. I really wanted the sun to break through and put direct light on the foreground. This was never to eventuate. What I did get was some amazing colour lighting up the clouds minutes before sunrise. Switching to wide angle to get as much sky in as possible, I reframed reducing the amount of ground in the photograph. You can see how the fog has moved away from me, but now risen higher around the peaks, blocking their view entirely.

This is a great little spot I’ve found, and there are some nice views south that should really come in handy during the next storm season. I really does pay to explore the back and side roads. I’ll be returning here for sure.

Amazing colourful clouds above the rural landscape at Purga south of Ipswich Queensland Australia in this photograph by award winning Landscape Photographer Murray Fox
12mm, ISO 200, F/8, 1/20 second

I’m progressing with my foray into film photography. I should have a complete setup completed within the next few weeks. I’ll then be working my way through rolls of film and look forward to sharing my results with you.

I really hope you enjoyed this weeks blog post as much as I enjoyed writing it for you. Can I suggest subscribing to my email list to receive occasional Tips, Ideas, News of Prints and Offers.



 

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An absolutely stunning photograph of the rolling hills of Marburg surrounded by fog and amazing sunlight beaming through as views from upon high near Ipswich Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape and Weather Storm Photographer Murray Fox

Fun in the Fog

Its been quite a while since I’ve had a real run and gun photography morning.

My inital plan went completely out the window when I woke up at 4:30am and realised two things. First was the radar was showing lots of cloud off the coast that would block any early light from the sunrise and second, I couldn’t see across the road because of the fog that had developed through the night! Rain the day before and a perfect temperature night mean that huge areas were covered in low lying fog.

I had to formulate a new plan. I now wasn’t worried about getting to a location an hour before sunrise. I was worried the sun would have to get too far into the sky to make it over the clouds at sea before the fog started to lift. My photo from my last blog post had me inspired to try an new perspective on the landscape, from a high vantage point, and I knew just the location. My only concern  was, I’d never been there before! It was near a couple of other spots I did know about so I figured if plan A failed, I had alternatives.

A 30 minute run from home found me making my way along the most incredible ridge line. There is enough room for maybe a house each side of the dirt road, before the land falls away completely down to the valley floor below. What an amazing spot and I’m kicking myself for never being here before. The fog was pooling between the hills in the valleys, absolutely perfectly what I wanted. I tried a few different shots before the sun came up, I really liked this one for the crepuscular rays that were beaming over those annoying high clouds at the coast. Not sure what had gone on with the grass here, kinda wondering if some cows might have been taken by aliens given the “crop circle” in front of me.

Beautiful Crepuscular Rays over the rolling hills of Marburg in Ipswich Queensland as the fog nestles in the valleys, viewed from an amazing height in Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photographer Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm, 1/320 Sec, F/7.1, ISO 200, 2 Stop ND Grad Filter

Want I really wanted however was that sun to break through the clouds and throw some light on the landscape below. I figured if I could keep the sun just out side of the frame I could get a nice angled back lit situation with amazing contrast. Well I didn’t have to wait too long before the sun did finally break through. The unfortunate part was that the beautiful colour wasn’t showing up the way I wanted. So hatching a plan, I decided to really zoom in on the landscape below, isolating the hills and the fog, almost removing the sky, and putting my camera into black and white mode, I can also add a tint. I tried a red/orange tint for warm light but it just didn’t work, going the other way I went with a cool tone (touch of blue) and really liked the results. These settings make no difference to the final photograph as I shoot in Raw and can develop the photograph any way I like. However it really does help you visualise in the field in that moment, what you are shooting for and lets you get your settings just right. This photo took all of 2 minutes to edit, really just convert to black and white, adjust the highlights and shadows to where I wanted them, and then add just a small amount of blue to the shadows in split toning. Done, and this is now one of my most favourite fog photographs ever! Running a print of this today and it’s going straight on the wall. Let me know in the comments below what you think.

An absolutely stunning photograph of the rolling hills of Marburg surrounded by fog and amazing sunlight beaming through as views from upon high near Ipswich Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape and Weather Storm Photographer Murray Fox
1/400 sec, ISO 200, F/8 @ 40mm

Finally finishing up on the ridge line, I knew my morning wasn’t quite over yet. It was time to run and gun. This is really simple. Drive around in amazing light and fog conditions until something grabs your eye, and STOP! If something gets your attention, no matter how small, how trivial, my rule is I have to get out and take a photograph. Well, in the next 40 minutes I stopped 8 times, and got 2 photographs I really liked. That is pure bonus for me as I knew I already had shots in the bag from the morning.

The first one I really liked has a detail that is really hard to see see unless you see the photograph up large, and I like that. It means only a few people will ever see that in person, those that see a print of mine, or who purchase a print. It’s not a dramatic photograph, it’s very simplistic. A tree, in a field, with the sun glowing through the fog behind. The detail I love, all that grass in front, is absolutely littered with circular shaped spider webs glistening with dew! I don’t know what type of spider, I’ll have to look into it because I’ve seen this a few times, but it looks amazing when you realise what it is.

A lone tree sits surrounded by glowing orange sunlight in the early morning fog at Marburg Ipswich Queensland Australia as the foreground is littered with dozens of spider webs glistening with dew by Award winning Australian landscape and weather storm photographer Murray Fox
1/2500 sec, ISO 200, F/8

This next photograph shows why I have that rule of you absolutely positively must stop and take a photograph. I only caught the very briefest of glimpses of this scene as I drove past. In fact I’d driven past it twice already that morning and not noticed it because it was set back quite a distance from the road. Jumping out of the car and grabbing my camera I knew I would need to zoom right in as far as I could for this one, as there didn’t appear to be any way to get closer (tip: I leave my camera mounted to my tripod on the back seat, I don’t have any concerns of it falling off as Olympus gear is just so light, this means I can be out and shooting in 5 seconds, also very handy when chasing storms). The benefit of this zooming in is all the elements of the scene get compressed together. The trees in front get closer to the Tower (as I’m calling it) and the hills behind get closer as well. I think this gives a nice intimate layering for this photograph. The sun was behind me and the colour, light and fog were just amazing.

Stunning beautiful early morning light bathes this rural barn and tower near Marburg Ipswich Queensland Australia as fog surrounds the scene. Captured by award winning Australian Landscape and Weather Storm photographer Murray Fox
1/200 sec, ISO 200, F/8.0

Finally it was time to pack up, what an amazing morning. Autumn is my favourite time of year for photography as there is just so much going on, from late season weather, to fog, to crystal clear nights for Astro, I suggest you get out now and get out often.

I really hope you enjoyed this weeks blog post as much as I enjoyed writing it for you. Can I suggest subscribing to my email list to receive occasional Tips, Ideas, News of Prints and Offers.



 

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Stunning sunrise from Govenors Chair Lookout at Spicers Gap overlooking the Fassifern Valley in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photography Murray Fox

Govenors Chair Sunrise

This morning was a sunrise meet up for the Scenic Rim Photo Walks group and the plan was to shoot sunrise from a fantastic location. Govenors Chair lookout has a stunning view over Mt Greville and the Fassifern valley. The plan was to arrive around an hour before sunrise which was just after 6am. Being around an hours drive from home, my tired brain set my alarm for 4:40am…uh oh. A quick race out and thankfully no traffic, I was just in time for sunrise. The early colour lit the clouds nicely but I was looking for the light after the sun rose.

Fog was nestled in locations throughout the valley, and there was a lovely haze in the air that just lit up with the morning glow of the sun when it broke through the clouds. This first photograph was looking south east, encompasing a wider view and showing the magnificent gradations of light and colour on the landscape, I absolutely love light like this and this photo shows why. Mind the step tho, that is a straight drop off at the end of the rock! You must practice extreme care photographing here.

Stunning sunrise from Govenors Chair Lookout at Spicers Gap overlooking the Fassifern Valley in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photography Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm, ISO 100, F/10, 1/500 Sec, 2 Stop Grad ND Filter

I also had my Lubitel medium format film camera with me. My first go at shooting colour film, I spent a lot of time metering and taking shots of various compositions as the light changed. I’ll have that roll back in a week or so, very excited to see what results I got, hopefully the exposure is okay because the colour should be amazing.

In between taking film shots, I took a more intimate photograph of Mt Greville. This is a beautiful peak from any direction and lies at the southern end of Lake Moogerah. The way the haze was lighting up the mountain, and the layers of the hills below me created beautiful steps of light that lead into the photograph. I composed this in portrait orientation to get as much of the hills below me in the shot while zoomed in a bit to really capture the size of Mt Greville. Let me know in the comments what you think of this photograph.

Mt Greville in the Scenic Rim of South East Queensland Australia at sunrise, viewed from Govenors Chair Lookout at Spicers Gap with stunning orange colours and light streaming through the landscape by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photography Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, ISO 100, F/10, 1/800 sec

It was a great morning, lovely to catch up with everyone on the photo walk. They are held monthly, I suggest checking the site out and coming along to a walk if you are in the area, it’s a great way to explore and see things you don’t normally see.

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Lubitel 166 Universal Murray Fox film photography landscape fomapan ektar 200 100 australia queensland

Ramblings – Exploring Film

Over the last year or so I’ve been playing around with film, in black and white which is the cheapest option I’ve found as I can develop at home quite easily.

It’s surprisingly a bit of a learning process. Digital cameras these days make life so much easier. My Olympus has live view in the view finder, will show me under and over exposed areas in real time, with a histogram overlay so getting exposure wrong is pretty much impossible. I’ve shot in RAW format for years which means every photo has to be post processed to bring back the contrast and colour and tweak it to show what I want to represent. I spend more time in front of the computer than behind the camera for sure, and I enjoy that process.

With film I’ve found I have to really slow down. Are my settings correct? Is my exposure right? I’ve had to re-learn measure exposure all over again. Every click of the shutter costs real money so you are double and triple checking every step, and also really considering the photograph, is it worth taking? It’s quite enjoyable and I find the results very rewarding.

I’ve been spending a lot of time looking at photographs I really enjoy, landscapes that inspire me, works that draw me in, and something I’ve discovered is the majority of those photos have been captured on film, and on large film to be precise. My recent trip to visit my family on the Central Coast of NSW saw me drop in to Ken Duncan’s Gallery (again!) and really spend some time viewing and looking at his works. They are printed big, on beautiful hahnemuhle paper, and framed wonderfully. These are the types of photographs I love. And it’s really interesting, you can spot the digital photographs he has taken with his awesome digital medium format cameras a mile away, they are sharp as a tack, amazing detail, but I kept leaning towards the photographs captured on film. They have a bit more glow, are usually a longer exposure, some of the details aren’t quite as sharp, you can see where the exposure had to be nailed to get it right at point of capture. And the colours..film has colours I don’t think digital can reproduce, they are just stunning.

I have two film cameras at the moment. A lovely Olympus Trip 35 point and shoot style 35mm camera that I generally load with black and white and use for street style photography or family snaps. It’s almost set and forget, just pick a focus zone and don’t worry about exposure, it nails it every time, yes, every single time, it’s an amazing piece of kit.

Olympus Trip 35 Film camera Murray Fox Australia Queensland photography
All that stuff around the lens measures the exposure, and powers the camera, no batteries here!

My next camera is a new purchase, a Russian made Lubitel 166 Universal. This is a twin lens reflex (TLR) medium format 120 film camera. It’s extremely simple and extremely manual in use, creates either a 6×6 or 6×4.5cm negative per photo (there is a mask you can change but you are looked into that option for each roll. You look down through the top to work out your composition, and use a little magnifying glass inside to get the focus correct.

 

Lubitel 166 Universal Murray Fox film photography landscape fomapan ektar 200 100 australia queensland
The cheapest medium format camera anywhere in the world, and gives great results when used right!

I’m working my way through a roll of black and white Fomapan 200 creative at the moment with this camera and absolutely loving the process. Working on a tripod (as I always do) getting the composition just right (the view is back to front so it makes you work for it!), measuring the exposure of the scene (I use a simple phone app), putting your settings in, cocking the shutter and then taking the photo. In 2 hours on the weekend I took two shots, total! And I loved it! The whole process of slowing down, really looking at the light of a scene, double checking exposure, framing, settings, and finally committing to the shot is really amazing to me.

My first roll is almost finished and this weekend I’m taking another little step in my film journey and shooting some Ektar 100 colour negative film. This is the modern landscape film of choice. Velvia 50 is what Ken Duncan uses a lot but it’s a lot harder and more expensive to use. The Ektar is very forgiving if you don’t quite get the exposure correctly and gives amazing colour and contrast. I’m really excited to see what results I can get from this film.

Medium format film, scanned in properly, will give a photograph file far larger than anything you can get from any DSLR digital camera, I’m talking hundreds of megapixels of data with a massive range of tones. I can scan a 35mm negative in at around 60mp, I can scan a 6×6 negative in at around 6 times that! The trick I use is I actually use my Olympus OMD Em5 MarkII digital camera, with a macro lens to take a photo of the negative, in hi res mode! Works startling well if you prep everything right.

All of this has me thinking about the next step in my photography. I really want to capture more landscapes with film, and I really want to have the full ability of selective choice in composition. I want big negatives that can give incredibly huge prints, I want the colours and tones that film gives with that beautiful fine grain. And I want bigger than 120 medium format! So now I’m saving, I’m working on getting a 4×5 field View Camera, a modern day version of what Ansel Adams used to use (although he was shooting bigger again with 8×10 I believe). A camera where it’s one shot per film, you need a dark cloth over you and the back of the camera just to compose, but you have the amazing ability to change the lens height, angle, swing for amazing depth of field, or custom focus bands. And a negative that is 4inch x 5inch in size, scanned size? @#%#@ huge!!

So I’m not quitting digital, I love my Olympus and it’ll be with me this weekend. But I’ll have the Lubitel and Olympus Trip with me as well, and they’ll be taking photos in a different way, it will be very interesting to see the results. I think film has a future in my work, some of the results that can be achieved with film are astonishing, and the process of slowing down, the time involved means more investment personally with every photograph taken. I look forward to a hybrid future of digital and analog.

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A beautiful dawn sky lights up the landscape over this old farmhouse in South East Queensland Australia

Beautiful Farmhouse Sunrise

I honestly think Queensland has the best old farmhouses in Australia. These beautiful old buildings dot the landscape, usually tucked away in little corners, some more known that others. I discovered this one a few years ago and finally thought conditions would be right to try and photograph it.

It’s a good drive from home, so another early start was required to get to my spot an hour before sunrise. I often find the best colour of sunrise to be before the sun gets up, the deep saturated colours look amazing and to capture them, you need to be on site well before time, setup, framed, and ready to shoot.

Battling my way through neck high grasses I got to my vantage point on the fenceline (thankfully a bit clearer) and set up shop. My aim this morning was to capture two, maybe three photographs of the same scene, each in their own different way.

The first photograph I captured was during the peak colour of dawn. The colour penetrates far into the sky, illuminating several layers of clouds which is always great as it puts colour everywhere. There was a little bit of a breeze, adding  to softness in the grass in the foreground due to movement over a long exposure. I framed everything quite centrally as I find it gives a lovely feeling of calm, just the thing for a scene like this. I used a 3 stop graduated filter to control the brightness in the sky.

A beautiful dawn sky lights up the landscape over this old farmhouse in South East Queensland Australia
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark 2, 12-40mm Pro @ 30mm, ISO 200, F/5.6, 50 second exposure

Next I decided to extend the exposure time even long and added a 6 stop filter. The clouds weren’t moving as fast as I hoped, but I waited for the light to be bright enough to give me around a 3-4 minute exposure, set my camera to live time and let it rip. Live time allows you to see regular updates of your exposure to ensure you get it perfect everytime. I had updates at every 30 seconds for this shot.

I do like this effect, the clouds soften right up and the foreground became even softer giving an almost dream like effect.

A stunning long exposure of a farmhouse with an amazing colourful dawn sky in South East Queensland Australia
ISO 200, 4 minutes, F/5.6

The final photograph I wanted to capture didn’t happen. The sun was to rise above the farmhouse right next to the mountain in the background. Unfortunately the clouds closed in and kept that light from happening. Welcome to landscape photography and I wasn’t upset in the least and very happy with the two photographs I got. I think it’s important to take the time and stay in your location for as long as possible to cover all the variations in light that may happen.

Thank you for reading this post. I would love to hear your opinions on this post or even just when is your favourite time of day in the comments below.

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A beautiful old tractor sits in the paddock as the core of the milky way lights up the sky above it near Kalbar and Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia south of Ipswich.

Kicking off Milkyway Season with a Bang!

With clear skies at night, not too cold and not too warm, conditions were absolutely perfect to chase some Milky Way photographs. It would mean a couple of late nights as the core only started to rise around 11pm, with peak time 1-2am however it certainly was worth it.

During the off season I’ve been watching a lot of videos and reading up on various techniques used by the best of the best when it comes to night time and astro photography. I had a head full of new ideas, which included changes to how I worked in the field capturing the images, as well as how I post processed the photos back on the computer.

Now I’ll be very up front about this, none of these photographs are a single image. It’s possible to do, however I don’t believe you can get the quality of file, increase of detail and control of noise in a single image, that you can get with multiple exposures. Some people get their knickers in a knot if it isn’t a single photograph, it doesn’t bother me in the slightest. My simple goal was to create an image of the vision in my head, using any tools and methods I could.

I met up with a very good friend and we decided to head south of Ipswich towards the rural farming areas. I knew of a couple of barns and other items that could make for a very interesting foreground, and hopefully would line up with the Milky Way behind them. I simply cannot pick which photograph is my favourite.

First stop was a barn and god was with us as it was full to the brim of bales. The sky here is so dark you can easily see the Milky Way with your eyes and that makes framing a since. I setup my gear, firmly locked down my tripod and focused on the stars (Olympus is amazing in that you can use focus peaking on the stars, just pick a bright one and it’s done). I proceeded to capture 8 photographs at ISO 5000, F/2.8, 15 seconds per exposure, at 12mm (equivalent to 24mm on a full frame camera. The 15 seconds ensures no star movement for pinpoint lights. I really racked up the ISO as I knew I would be stacking in and that will significantly reduce noise.

Once the sky shots were done, the fun began. I switched my camera to Live Composite mode, dropped the ISO to 400 for a lot cleaner file, and let it start. I used a torch to light paint the barn, first from the left side until the exposure was where I wanted it, then added a little fill from the right to soften the shadows.

All of this was stacked, blended, merged etc in Photoshop, there are some great videos on youtube about how to do this. And here is the final result!

An amazing night time photograph of a barn full of hay bales, beautiful illuminated with the core of the milky way rising behind it near Kalbar and Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia south of Ipswich.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm Pro, Multiple Exposures

Next we moved on down the road to where I had previously seen a tractor. Not knowing it was still there, I was very thankful I had spotlights on my 4wd to help light up the sides of the road, otherwise I may have missed it.

For this photograph the techniques used on the barn would be the same. This time I had to set the camera lower and closer, trying to fill the frame with as much of the tractor as possible, but still allowing room for the Milky Way around it. We could hear a pump running out in the field and before long, the Farmer who owns this land was out on his bike in the dark (stuffed if I know how he didn’t hit something!) checking his sprayers. He dropped over to say G’day (and check what we were doing). He was off to bed for a few hours nap before getting up to check the sprayers again. Life can be gruelling for a farmer, they all have my utmost respect.

Again, I captured 8 images for the sky and one light painted one for the tractor and ground. I always recommend painting from both sides to even out the light a little.

A beautiful old tractor sits in the paddock as the core of the milky way lights up the sky above it near Kalbar and Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia south of Ipswich.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm Pro, Multiple Exposures

There was one more photograph I had envisaged to capture before heading out this night, and that was of some beautiful crop lights with the Milky Way over them. Unfortunately it looks like I missed out by one day as all the fields had been just harvested. I’ll just have to wait until later in the season to get that photograph. So instead we took a drive back into Peaks Crossing where you have a clear view of Flinders Peak to the east. By this time (2am) the core was at a nice height in the sky. Again I captured 8 images to stack for the sky, and used my torch to paint in the foreground. On a clear night light this, if you are staying in an area with pretty much the same light pollution levels, you rarely need to change your settings, allowing you to spend much more time on the important things like composition and spooking yourself in the dark.

A stunning view of the core of the milky way as it rises over Flinders Peak near Peak Crossing in the Scenic Rim south of Ipswich, Queensland, Australia
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm Pro, Multiple Exposures

Finally as a bonus, I had headed out the night before this to South Ripley to do a test run of my settings, post techniques etc. I captured this photograph. I think it’s came out a bit dark, ISO used for the sky was 3200, which is why I upped to 5000 for the next night. Practice pays.

A beautiful clear night at South Ripley, near Ipswich Queensland Australia as the core of the milky way rises over the farmland.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark 2, 12-40mm Pro, Multiple Exposures

As the season progresses, I’ll be doing a lot more astro photography. Thank you for reading.

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Amazing colour in the sky during this long exposure at sunrise over the Brisbane River near Ipswich Queensland Australia

Brisbane River Long Exposure

My plan this morning was to head to a new spot for me on the Brisbane river, not far from Ipswich. The clouds early were moving quite fast but the wind at ground level was almost non-existant. I started thinking a long exposure might be something to try.

Arriving at the parking location I began the walk down to the river. The first part of the track was pretty easy, patches of gravel and not too steep. That soon changed when I was confronted with waist high grass before the river. Plowing on (literally) I finally arrived at my location 10 minutes later, drenched from waist to toe, ahh the joys of landscape photography.

There was some colour starting to appear in the sky so I had to make some decisions quickly. The texture of the clouds was messy, so I decided, super long exposure to make things super silky. I would use a polarising filter to remove some of the glare from the water (this also has the effect of adding around 1.5 stops of exposure time. Next I would add a 10 stop neutral density filter to give me some very long exposure times.

With the filters off the camera I set the camera in to manual mode, set my focus where I wanted it, I put the aperture at F8 which ensured me everything would be in focus and give me an extra long exposure time. ISO kept at base 200 for best quality.

Now it was time for another trick built into my Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II camera. This feature is called “Live Time”. You press the shutter once to start the exposure, and at regular intervals (I had it set for every 30 seconds) the rear screen updates with a photo of the exposure at that time, and updates the histogram. It’s as simple as letting  this run for as long as you want and stopping it before it starts to over expose. I always have long exposure noise reduction enabled, the time it takes you extra in the field (essentially doubles your exposure time) you save so much more in post processing trying to fix the noise.

This photo ended up taking 8 minutes of exposure time and 8 minutes of noise reduction time. So it was a one shot while the colour lasted in the sky.

Amazing colour in the sky during this long exposure at sunrise over the Brisbane River near Ipswich Queensland Australia
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, Olympus 12-40mm Pro, F/8, 8 minutes, ISO 200

There has been very minimal post processing done to this photograph. A little bit of contrast added and some colour pop was all that was needed.

I took a few more shots as the light got brighter. I was really hoping the sun would break through and throw some direct light on the trees on the far bank but it was not to be this morning. I did like the smooth results I was getting however, and found the tree trunks were contrasting very nicely against the green vegetation. I ended up converting this photo to a very simple black and white.

A lovely black and white long exposure photograph of the Brisbane River near Ipswich Queensland Australai.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm Pro, F/8, ISO 200, 4 minutes

With the bouts of wet weather and cloudy conditions we are having here at the moment, I will be exploring long exposures a little more often I think, the results are quite lovely.

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A beautiful misty and foggy country landscape captured near Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia

When nothing goes to plan, Improvise!

Well sometimes the best laid plans go completely array. When it comes to landscape photography this can happen more often than not, that’s the way of mother nature. There is a very photogenic mountain peak south of where I live. I had worked out a location I wanted to shoot from, and I was going to experiment using a long lens (in the realms of 140-200mm) to see what compositions I could get.

To get there an hour before sunrise I had to leave home at 3am for the 1.5 hour drive south. As soon as I left home I knew something wasn’t right. It has been raining, and I couldn’t see clouds or stars. A low cloud layer was blanketing the area. Never one to give up, I kept going, and started driving through intermittent rain and fog. I finally arrived at my location to be greeted with a wall of white.

Well this wasn’t what I was after. I waited over an hour and a half until after sunrise, with the faint hope some sun might break through, or the peak would at least become partially visible. This photo shows the result however, the peak was still buried in the fog. I used a long lens to compress the fence line and bring everything closer.

A fence line stretches across the paddock and into the fog and mist near Boonah Queenland Australia in the Scenic Rim.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, Adapted Canon FD 70-210mm Lens, F/8, 1/100 sec, ISO 2000 handheld

I finally gave up on this location and decided to improvise. I began looking for scenes that caught my eye, ideally with a leading valley through the scene and a main subject to frame. This next photograph is the first one I came across. Again use the adapted long lens I was able to compress the scene, isolating the trees from the rest of the scene. Long lenses are great for when you don’t have an immediate foreground. You can still get a great result and composition, it does take some practice however to find a scene that works. Its an area I’m still learning and will be exploring more for sure.

I focused only on the trees so the background went a little soft as well. I think this one came out quite nicely and just a touch more sun was finally getting through to add some contrast to the ground.

A small Stand of trees stands out against the landscape near Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, Adapted Canon FD 70-210mm F/8, ISO 200, 1/4 sec

The final scene I found called for a lens change, I had a foreground interest nice and close, so I switched to my Olympus 12-40mm pro lens and spent some time framing up a composition. Again the portrait orientation worked, eliminating some clutter from the sides and bringing focus to the dead wood and then the main tree in the photograph. You can see by this time a lot of the fog had cleared, but the low cloud was still incredibly thick. I never did see the mountain on this morning. A return trip is definitely on order as I think it will be an amazing photograph in the right weather and light.

A beautiful misty and foggy country landscape captured near Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, Olympus 12-40mm, ISO 200, 1/50 sec, F/8

I’m still deciding whether the second or third image is my favourite from this day, comment below and let me know which one is yours.

Landscape photography can be very frustrating at times. All the best laid plans, all the pre-visualisation and effort you put into capturing a photograph can come to naught in a very short space of time. It pays to at least be somewhat prepared to seek alternatives if things don’t work out. It could be making sure you carry a few different lenses, having the tripod in the car if you are planning to shoot handheld, or even waiting a few hours to see if anything changes or improves (pro tip, have some food and drink with you always!). This day did not go the way I planned, yet I’m very happy with at least two of the photographs I managed to capture, and now I’ve done a practice run to the location, I know it will be perfect when the light and weather are right. I might not get it next time, but I will get it. Persistence pays.

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Be sure to visit regularly, follow me on Facebook or Twitter where I’ll post links to each new blog post as it happens, also follow me on Instagram where I post up my photographs, and My Story will have lots of behind the scenes photos and videos.

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