Tag: kodak

Australian Landscape Photography - Murray Fox -Bundamba Lagoon, Ipswich, Queensland, Australia at sunrise on Kodak Portra 160 4x5 Large Format Film by Australian Landscape Photographer Murray Fox

My colour 4×5 large format film Journey begins – Lagoon Sunrise

Bundamba Lagoon, Ipswich, Queensland at sunrise, photographed by Queensland Landscape Photographer Murray Fox based in Australia on Large Format 4x5 Film Kodak Portra 160.

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Australian Landscape Photography - Murray Fox -An old farm house sits in a drought dry field near Gatton in the Lockyer Valley of Queensland Australia. Photographed by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox

Drought House

Two years ago there was a golden field of wheat as far as the eye could see around this old house. Now, the land is bone dry and barren. There will be no winter crop this season, there is no water. The drought continues on and we pray for rain. Photographed with my Crown Graphic 4×5 Camera on Kodak Portra 160 film.

An old farm house sits in a drought dry field near Gatton in the Lockyer Valley of Queensland Australia. Photographed by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox

Australian Landscape Photography - Murray Fox The chair at the top of Mt French in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia near Boonah as photographed on a Crown Graphic 4x5 film camera using Kodak Tmax 100 by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox

The next step – Large Format Photography

I was fortunate enough to come across a great deal and as an end result I am now the happy owner of a 50+ something year old Crown Graphic 4×5 camera. Simplicity itself to use, it’s basically a light tight box with a lens attached and a ground glass at the back for framing and focusing. It does have some other dohickies to help with that as well but I want to keep everything simple.

This camera takes 4inch x 5inch sheet film (HUGE!) or I can also use 120 Medium format film with a rear attachment for 8 shots in 6cm x 9cm size (again, still massive). This gives me the best of both worlds really. I can shoot 6×9 and keep costs down and go for the 4×5 when only the best quality will do.

Currently I’m only geared up to do 4×5 in black and white, but will be working to get colour home development sorted in the next month or so, then I will probably shoot more 4×5 than anything else.

Why 4×5? There are several things really that I wanted. One, is huge size/great quality, you get this in spades with the negatives. You also shoot one at a time and can change between different films on the fly as long as you have them loaded in a holder. A lot harder to do with medium format where you must finish the current roll, or carry multiple (and expensive) backs.

You can develop 1 photo at a time, especially nice with black and white as you can then do neat tricks with developing to change the end result/contrast etc.

The other is movements. This is a biggie for me. Out of the box with the 90mm lens my Crown Graphic has, movements are pretty limited, some rise, tilt upwards and shift left right. What I really wanted was lens tilt forward, this really helps with landscapes to get close focus and distant focus all in the same shot, while keeping everything parallel. Only cameras with movements or very expensive shift lenses can do this.

A quick modification to the front standard (reversing it) and I now have lens tilt forward along with rise, just perfect for landscapes. The rest of my kit is pretty budget, I’m just using an old black short as a dark cloth, and I have 5 holders (10 shots), more than enough really as I only plan to shoot 1 to 2 photos each time I go out. So 2 shots b&w and 2 shots colour loaded.

Well it was time to go and play so an early start saw me at the top of Mt French, getting slightly wet from the odd shower, and cursing the lack of the real light I wanted. Note, I also had not reversed the front standard yet, it was only after developing this photo I realised I really needed front tilt for focus control.

Anyway, there is a great spot in the middle of the heather where you can sit and chill. With the slightly gloomy conditions I just knew that black and white was the way to go. I had 2 sheets of Kodak Tmax 100 loaded and I exposed both, one as I metered and 1 a bit over exposed. I then developed both at home using the same time and went with the negative I was happiest with, which was the normal exposure. A good learning experience.

The level of detail in the photo blows me away, zoomed in you can see the individual rain drops on the chair and all the branches, leaves, rocks etc have wonderful textures. I even like the focus fall off into the distance even tho I really wanted it all sharp.

I also captured a few 6×9 frames in Kodak Ektar 100, a wonderful colour film, looking the other way from this view over the heather and nearby mountain. Those will have to wait for another day as I’ve not yet finished that roll, the joys of film 🙂

For anyone wondering why do all this, film is dead etc, go visit Alex Bourke. Alex is my inspiration in 4×5 photography, his images are just outstanding and he teaches a lot. I’ve purchased his Ebooks and regularly read them and his knowledge works. If I can get photos of Australia half as good as his USA photos, I’ll be in heaven.

Until next time, take care!

Murray

A simply amazing and super saturated sunrise over Moreton Bay at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane Queensland Australia captured on a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film

Seascapes, Landscapes, Night Photography, The Wonder of Ektar 100 Film

Well another roll of Kodak Ektar 100 Film in 120 Medium format done and dusted. I was very much looking forward to seeing how the shots on this roll came out. I actually had quite a variety of shoots on this one, a few photos I bracketed, or forgot to lock the mirror up and retook and one I completely stuffed it up by setting the shutter speed wrong..and still managed a recoverable shot, blew my mind! With my Mamiya 645 Medium format camera I get 15 shots per roll and with this one I got 6 photos I absolutely love and a few others that came out nice as well. I think it’s my best hit rate to date on film.

Starting with an overnight stay up at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane for my wedding anniversary back in October, I took the opportunity for an early start to capture sunrise over the water. I was really looking for just simple compositions here, nothing fancy at all. My thoughts at the time was if I got a good one, I’ll have it printed and matted and send it to my Parents as a gift, they have very much an ocean theme through their house.

This first shot was captured well before sunrise, when the first colour of dawn was hitting the sky. I used a 2 stop Graduated ND filter to keep the brightness of the sky close to the water. Those colours were just amazing, but I could have exposed a little bit longer to get more detail into the rocks.

A stunning dawn over Moreton Bay at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane Queensland Australia captured on a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 45mm Lens, Kodak Ektar 100 Film 120 Format

Next I waited around until the sun actually rose. There was some great cloud around the horizon and it was filtering the sun, throwing out colour. Again I used the 2 stop hard grad ND filter, exposed for the water and just let the Ektar 100 film do it’s thing. It has an amazing ability to get so much detail into the highlights even if they are many many stops brighter. I really liked how this one came out, and those colours, wow! Pretty sure I’ll be sending this one to Mum & Dad for Christmas. I’ve added this photograph to my Landscapes Portfolio, it’s simple, but I really like it.

A simply amazing and super saturated sunrise over Moreton Bay at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane Queensland Australia captured on a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 45mm, Ektar 100

Next it was time to head back to the country. This time I was experimenting with time of day, a different lens here and there. This next photograph was over some corn almost ready to harvest near Kalbar in the Scenic Rim. I used the Mamiya 80mm lens at F4 (think I will try F2.8 next time) to focus only on the closest corn and let everything behind fade into blur. It kinda worked but not 100% the result I was aiming for, I think my biggest issue was I was too low, need to get higher and show the depth in there to give that blur a more noticeable effect. Still, the early morning side light was wonderful and I like how peaceful this photograph feels.

Beautiful morning light across a cornfield near Kalbar in the scenic rim of Queensland Australia captured on medium format Mamiya 645 camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 80mm, Ektar 100

This next one was the same morning but during dawn and I think is my favourite photo from this roll. I was really hoping for clouds, but now the film is developed and I see those colours, wow! Eye popping stuff. Kodak Ektar 100 is a very saturated film, and I’m finding the dawn light, before the sun gets up, has slightly lower contrast, but simply amazing colour results. Definitely need to shoot more at this time of day with this film. Again I used a 2 stop ND grad to control the brightness of the sky, this was around a 90 second exposure at f/16. I’ve added this to my Landscapes Portfolio. This location is Kents Lagoon north of Kalbar in the scenic rim of South East Queensland Australia. I’m standing on quite an old, single lane wooden bridge to get this photo, praying the locals all decided to sleep in so I wouldn’t have to run off the bridge with my gear, and then set it all up again! 🙂 Except for one fella plowing his field, I was car free for an hour thankfully.

Stunning dawn colours looking up Kents Lagoon near Kalbar in the scenic rim of Queensland Australia, captured using a Mamiya 645 medium format camera on Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, 45mm, Ektar 100

Finally I decided to try this film at night. The results were good, at least my metering was right and I didn’t stuff up the photos lol! That’s the hardest part, you have no idea of you got it right, so you check, double check, check again, think about taking the shot, wait for a car to move that just pulled up, start again in case the light changed. Honestly, I loved every minute of it, it’s so much fun, and you really REALLY slow down and think about every press of that shutter button. All of that happened with this first one, but finally everything was clear and the shot taken. This is a pub not far from home, right next to the highway at Haigslea. Very happy with how much latitude I captured between the dark shadows and the bright highlights. I think I need to revisit this one, maybe with some Portra 160 film which has a much more soft pastel pallet, and do it at sunset for some colour and go wider with the view.

The Sundown Saloon Haighslea west of Ipswich Queensland Australia captured at night on a medium format Mamiya 645 camera with Kodak Etkar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, 80mm, Ektar 100

Finally I dropped into Marburg just up the road the same night. The post office there is very quaint and I quite liked the look of it at night. I had to shoot a fairly tight crop to avoid the parked vehicles from the pub goers. Again, I used the 80mm, around f/11 to keep some depth of field. Ended up being around a 80 second exposure. I just love the bail of hay out the front, really lets you know this ain’t no city post office!

The Post Office at Marburg west of Ipswich Queensland Australia captured at night on a medium format Mamiya 645 camera with Kodak Etkar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, 80mm, Ektar 100

I’m going to get my hands on some Cinestill 800T film soon, that stuff looks just amazing for night city and architecture photographs, it blooms around light sources with a super interesting colour pallet.

I’ve got plenty of film in the fridge now to shoot. This roll was really about trying different things and gaining confidence with the equipment and the results. I’m extremely happy with how it all went, and I can quite confidently now go out and shoot on film and not be too concerned with the results as long as I remember to do all the steps. It’s a very manual process, and I absolutely love it. Looking forward to doing some more black and white film soon too.

Let me know in the comments below which is your favourite shot!

Thank you so much for reading and getting to this point, I really really appreciate it. Follow me on Facebook and Instagram to keep up to date, and visit again soon. I sell all of my photographs as Fine Art Prints, Canvas prints and Prints on either Acrylic or Metal, if you’d like one for yourself, simply contact me and I’ll send you pricing details.

Film Landscapes & Slow Motion Lightning

Finally got around to getting a roll developed and I’m 3/4 of the way through shooting another roll. I’m starting to get the hang of shooting film. For my film of choice for landscapes, Kodak Ektar 100, I’ve found you really have to nail the exposure for your subject (usually the land) and then filter the sky to keep it to say within a stop in brightness. Film will handle a much brighter sky, but you then have to try and pull it all back in post production on the computer.

Getting it right in camera using filters etc really pays off with film and saves you a bunch of time on the computer at a later date, when you’ve forgotten what you even shot lol! I’m using a Mamiya 645 1000s medium format camera, my go to landscape lens for the wider scene is the Mamiya 45mm. Film is Kodak Ektar 100. I have a local lab develop for me (just normal develop) and then I scan the negatives at home using an Epson V550. From there it’s really just getting the colours right and some sharpening in Photoshop, as well as removing any dust and scratches, probably the worst part of film.

This first photograph has to be my favourite film photo to date. I also shot this on digital, and I’ve even done Astro photography here, but the way this has come out, the colour, the soft glowing light, yeah, really happy with this one.

An amazingly stunning sunrise of an old broken down farm truck as the landscape is bathed in colours from orange to pink to red at Mt Walker near Ipswich Queensland Australia. Photographed on Kodak Ektar 100 by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645 1000s, 45mm, Kodak Ektar 100

I was pretty much treating this roll of film as a test case, I was bracketing most photos to see which exposure would work best (take good notes!) and photographing landscapes in various lighting conditions. On one recent storm chase I had some time so I broke out the film camera once again and captured this photograph. Those Ektar Reds are really popping in this one and the light that broke through the clouds really made this photograph work for me.

A storm cell approaches Purga just south of Ipswich Queensland Australia. Photographed on Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645 1000s, 45mm, Kodak Ektar 100

Finally, after another chase, I decided to see what I could do with a reverse sunset, that is looking east as the sun was setting west. This one didn’t quite work out for me, the main issue being if I kept colour on the landscape, none of it was up in the clouds yet, and if I waited for it to be in the clouds, it wasn’t on the landscape anymore. So this was more of a test/compromise shot, however I do know in this kind of light it would be much better to find an amazing subject I can get very close too and really highlight those colours on the landscape, wow golden hour smacks you in the face with this film!

A beautiful sunset as the last light of day falls across the hills. A river bends its way through reaching for the Brisbane River. Captured on Kodak Ektar 100 at Redbank near Ipswich Queensland Australia by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645 1000s, 45mm, Kodak Ektar 100

So the plan is now to keep shooting more film and really start working on the composition and subjects. My confidence has increased a lot thanks to some major trial and error, time and of course, money, film costs every click.

Thank you very much for ready my blog this week. If you’d also like to check out a very short cool video I made yesterday with some slow motion lightning captures click below :

I sell all of my photographs as Fine Art Prints, Canvas prints and Prints on either Acrylic or Metal, if you’d like one for yourself, simply contact me and I’ll send you pricing details.

Until next time, enjoy!

Murray

A beautiful young tree showing autumn colour surrounded by long winter dry grass in Ipswich Queensland Australia as captured by Landscape PHotographer Murray Fox using a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film Camera , the Mamiya 45mm Lens and Kodak Ektar 100 film.

Fun with Film 17/06/18

I’ve finally gotten around to getting my first two rolls of colour film developed. Both of these are Kodak Ekatar 100 film. One roll I shot with my Lubitel 166u square format twin lens camera, the other roll I shot with my Mamiya 645 Medium format camera and a variety of lenses.

I used Fotofast in Brisbane for the development, very fast (2 hours) and well priced, best benefit is not too far from home either saving postage costs. Both rolls came out well developed and I think I only underexposed a couple of frames, both on the Lubitel which was before I got my spot meter. All the photos on the Mamiya using the spot meter came out perfect.

It’s certainly a huge learning curve. Not only do you have to get exposure right, but you then have to learn how to scan, how different films react to different light. I’m using an Epson v550 Photo scanner which does both 35mm and 120mm film well.

I’m still working my way through scanning the photos and putting the final touches on them but wanted to share with you what I have captured so far. None of these are earth shattering photos, they are about the learning process, trying different subjects in different light and learning all the steps with an aim towards knowing the whole process inside and out. Only then will I truly start to capture what I think will be very unique and stunning film photographs.

I actually love how this first photo came out. Using the Mamiya and the longest lens I have for it, a 150mm, shooting with the aperture wide open, the shallow depth of field is amazing with medium format. This is something I going to have to explore a lot more of. These lilies are not far from home in a little hidden pond, a nice discovery that I’ll be visiting again for sure.

Water lilies in the pond captured on Kodak Ektar 100 Film using a Mamiya 645 Medium format camera and a Mamiya 150mm lens by Landscape Photographer Murray Fox in Ipswich Queensland Australia
Mamiya 645, Ektar 100, 150mm Lens

This next photograph is my favourite so far from the Lubitel. It shoots in square format which really changes how you end up composing a photograph. I captured this at Governors Lookout near Spicers Gap in the scenic rim of South East Queensland Australia during the photowalk a little while ago. That early morning soft light, the slight imperfections of the camera softening the edges. I really like the feel of this, can’t wait to try it in some mist and fog. Pretty dang good for a $40 medium format camera from Russia!

Beautiful gum trees on a hill, one with the bark splitting from it as the early morning light bathes the bush near Spicers Gap in south east Queensland Australia by Landscape Photographer Murray Fox, captured on Film using a Lubitel 166 universal and Kodak Ektar 100 film.
Lubitel 166 Universal, Kodak Ektar 100.

Next is another Lubitel shot. The light was pretty harsh and I did underexpose this a bit. What it shows is if this film is underexposed, you still capture all the detail perfectly, but a blue cast that is not easy to get rid of can appear across the image. Especially in the shadows. Better to overexpose a touch and really get those wonderful Kodak Ektar colours.

Queens Park in Ipswich Queensland Australia in stunning autumn colour captured with a Lubitel 166 universal camera using Kodak Ektar 100 film by Landscape Photographer Murray Fox.
Lubitel 166u, Kodak Ektar 100

This next photo, shot on the Mamiya, shows what colour you can get when you get the exposure bang on. It also blew me away how narrow the depth of field is with the 150mm when used in close, I’m really going to have to watch that, but it will be fun to use it on the correct scene as well!

A beautiful vibrant colourful bird of paradise flower as captured by Landscape photogapher Murray Fox in Ipswich, Queensland, Australia
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 150mm, Kodak Ektar 100

Finally a photo of what I’m hoping to really use my Mamiya setup for, landscapes! I found this young tree showing some nice colour in a park near home. The golden hour light was falling across enhancing the gold even more. The lack of clouds wasn’t ideal but I do like the contrast of the blue on the gold.

A beautiful young tree showing autumn colour surrounded by long winter dry grass in Ipswich Queensland Australia as captured by Landscape PHotographer Murray Fox using a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film Camera , the Mamiya 45mm Lens and Kodak Ektar 100 film.
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 45mm Lens, Kodak Ektar 100 Film

Let me know in the comments below which is your favourite photo from this weeks post, and if you shoot film, let me know what you are shooting gear and film wise, drop a link to your work, I always love to be inspired by others!

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