Tag: light

This Old Shack sits on a property near Ipswich Queensland Australia. 4x5 Large Format Black and White Film photograph on Kodak Tmax 100 by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox

This Old Shack – Making Mistakes & Loving it

I made a big mistake when photographing this old shack, but thankfully film is so forgiving and I was still able to get a usable image. 4x5 Large Format landscape photography. Read the blog for all the details.

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The chair at the top of Mt French in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia near Boonah as photographed on a Crown Graphic 4x5 film camera using Kodak Tmax 100 by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox

The next step – Large Format Photography

I was fortunate enough to come across a great deal and as an end result I am now the happy owner of a 50+ something year old Crown Graphic 4×5 camera. Simplicity itself to use, it’s basically a light tight box with a lens attached and a ground glass at the back for framing and focusing. It does have some other dohickies to help with that as well but I want to keep everything simple.

This camera takes 4inch x 5inch sheet film (HUGE!) or I can also use 120 Medium format film with a rear attachment for 8 shots in 6cm x 9cm size (again, still massive). This gives me the best of both worlds really. I can shoot 6×9 and keep costs down and go for the 4×5 when only the best quality will do.

Currently I’m only geared up to do 4×5 in black and white, but will be working to get colour home development sorted in the next month or so, then I will probably shoot more 4×5 than anything else.

Why 4×5? There are several things really that I wanted. One, is huge size/great quality, you get this in spades with the negatives. You also shoot one at a time and can change between different films on the fly as long as you have them loaded in a holder. A lot harder to do with medium format where you must finish the current roll, or carry multiple (and expensive) backs.

You can develop 1 photo at a time, especially nice with black and white as you can then do neat tricks with developing to change the end result/contrast etc.

The other is movements. This is a biggie for me. Out of the box with the 90mm lens my Crown Graphic has, movements are pretty limited, some rise, tilt upwards and shift left right. What I really wanted was lens tilt forward, this really helps with landscapes to get close focus and distant focus all in the same shot, while keeping everything parallel. Only cameras with movements or very expensive shift lenses can do this.

A quick modification to the front standard (reversing it) and I now have lens tilt forward along with rise, just perfect for landscapes. The rest of my kit is pretty budget, I’m just using an old black short as a dark cloth, and I have 5 holders (10 shots), more than enough really as I only plan to shoot 1 to 2 photos each time I go out. So 2 shots b&w and 2 shots colour loaded.

Well it was time to go and play so an early start saw me at the top of Mt French, getting slightly wet from the odd shower, and cursing the lack of the real light I wanted. Note, I also had not reversed the front standard yet, it was only after developing this photo I realised I really needed front tilt for focus control.

Anyway, there is a great spot in the middle of the heather where you can sit and chill. With the slightly gloomy conditions I just knew that black and white was the way to go. I had 2 sheets of Kodak Tmax 100 loaded and I exposed both, one as I metered and 1 a bit over exposed. I then developed both at home using the same time and went with the negative I was happiest with, which was the normal exposure. A good learning experience.

The level of detail in the photo blows me away, zoomed in you can see the individual rain drops on the chair and all the branches, leaves, rocks etc have wonderful textures. I even like the focus fall off into the distance even tho I really wanted it all sharp.

I also captured a few 6×9 frames in Kodak Ektar 100, a wonderful colour film, looking the other way from this view over the heather and nearby mountain. Those will have to wait for another day as I’ve not yet finished that roll, the joys of film 🙂

For anyone wondering why do all this, film is dead etc, go visit Alex Bourke. Alex is my inspiration in 4×5 photography, his images are just outstanding and he teaches a lot. I’ve purchased his Ebooks and regularly read them and his knowledge works. If I can get photos of Australia half as good as his USA photos, I’ll be in heaven.

Until next time, take care!

Murray

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The perfect Australian night scene with an old shack overlooking the landscape and a wonderful dead tree, under the core of the Milky Way in Queensland Australia as photographed by Australian landscape photographer Murray Fox

Rural Nights – Astro Photograph

Sometimes the stars align, literally! I headed out with my good friend Craig Bachmann Photography and we met up with the owner of this fantastic private property. He had told us he had a great old shack we could photograph and we had no idea what we were in for. As soon as I saw the shack I let out a whoop, then I saw the tree and instantly an idea formed of how I wanted to frame this.

It took a few minutes for our eyes to adjust and really locate the core of the Milky Way. OMG! Straight out from the tree! Quickly we set about shooting, getting the multiple shots for the stars to stack and reduce noise, and one of them captured a meteorite! Geez talk about winning.

Next we set about light painting, and this was the first test of my new Lumanzi L1 light cube, WOW! This tiny little thing puts out a tonne of light, and it has gels. We used an orange one to light up the inside of the shack.

Combined with the air glow in the distance, passing cloud and some haze, there was colour everywhere in this photo. A few hours on the computer brought all 21 frames together to create the final image I had envisioned. Love it!

Thank you again to the owner for not only telling us about this location and opening your gates to us, but for running around with my light, painting the scene at my direction lol! Gotta love a free recruit 🙂

This photograph has been added to my Nightscapes Gallery where you can purchase it for your wall in many different formats, easily and simply all directly online. Custom work available, just contact me with your interest.

Thank you very much for taking the time to read, leave a comment below if you think this really is a great Aussie landscape 🙂

The perfect Australian night scene with an old shack overlooking the landscape and a wonderful dead tree, under the core of the Milky Way in Queensland Australia as photographed by Australian landscape photographer Murray Fox

Gear used : Sony A7 and Samyang 14mm, Lumanzi L1 Light cube, Manfrotto Tripod, Shutter Boss cabled remote trigger, and one property owner! 🙂

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A stunning sunset over sunflowers at Mt Walker in Ipswich and the Scenic Rim of Queenland Australia looking west over the great dividing range. A panorama wall art / fine art photograph captured by Australian Landscape and Weather photographer Murray Fox

Sunflower Sunset

Well wasn’t this a challenge! My self and my good friend Craig had been in contact with a local farmer. He advised us his sunflowers were in their prime so we arranged a visit for Sunday afternoon to shoot it through sunset.

The massive problem was Tropical Cyclone Oma was approaching through the week and ended up sitting off the coast for a few days. The rain didn’t happen but boy did we get the wind. Capturing a stitched panoramic photograph can be challenging at anytime, throw in very strong winds with a close subject that moves around a lot, add just a sprinkle of low light as sunset occurs and I almost didn’t get a shot.

Thankfully, my previous experience with panoramas this year is really paying off and the final result, well, not blowing my own horn here but wow! This is the best panorama I’ve captured so far.

Timing was a bit rushed too as we first did a quick portrait shoot for the lovely couple who own the property, always great to give something back for being graciously granted permission onto their property. I’ve photographed in this area for nearly 10 years now and never have I captured a sunset with such a wonderful view as this.

Post production putting the final image together was also a super challenge. I ended up spending well over 5 hours putting all the pieces together and checking pretty much down to each flower everything joined up correctly. Hard work, but well worth the results.

Hopefully the rains come soon, everyone needs a drop so much.

A stunning sunset over sunflowers at Mt Walker in Ipswich and the Scenic Rim of Queenland Australia looking west over the great dividing range. A panorama wall art / fine art photograph captured by Australian Landscape and Weather photographer Murray Fox

I’m doing a bit more portrait work lately, it’s a change from the normal and being the obsessive technical type, a great challenge with lots of new things to learn. My first love is still landscapes and now panoramas however, so I may even explore the possibility of combining the two for something truly unique, stay tuned!

I’ve added this photograph to my Landscape Portfolio, and you may click here to find out more information about purchasing this photograph as a Limited Edition Acrylic Print.

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Stunning Panorama of the Together Trees near Fernvale in Queensland Australia. Sunrise / Dawn landscape Australian Panoramic Panorama Photographer Murray Fox

Together

A friend first shared a photo of these trees with me a few weeks back. Ever since then I’ve been chomping at the bit to get out and shoot them at sunrise. The location, the vista, the rolling hills behind and the simplicity of the scene just fired my imagination. This was perfect for a panorama and I couldn’t wait!

The last two mornings have had nil cloud, a 3:30am start saw me heading to Fernvale to meet up with my mate who was going to be my guide for the morning. Thankfully permission with the landowner was organised and after parking and walking in we began to work the scene. From one vantage point, the two trees appear to be intertwined and I really liked that view point.

Lots of moving around using my panorama tool to work out framing (this “tool” is a piece of cardboard with a window cut out of it in the 3:1 ratio). This makes it super quick to work out the best angle to shoot from. I’ve yet to find an Android Phone app that can do the same ratio (if you know of one, let me know please! Most get close but not 3:1).

This was the first photo I took, very early dawn light and colour. The clouds were clearing up quickly and the next few photos didn’t really work out for me. The sun is rising to the left of frame, this causes the colour to darken across the sky, giving a lovely change in hue as it goes.

2 Rows of 8 photographs were captured to make this panorama. The end result is very big file that can be printed exceptionally large, which is my goal for all my panoramas.

There are many more spots on this property to investigate, and I think once Winter is here, add some fog, or even some Astro is definitely on the cards, magic spot.

Stunning Panorama of the Together Trees near Fernvale in Queensland Australia. Sunrise / Dawn landscape Australian Panoramic Panorama Photographer Murray Fox
Click to find out how to get your own copy of this photograph for your wall as an amazing Acrylic Print.

I’ve added this photography to my Landscape Portfolio.

You can find the in the field video for this photograph here : https://murrayfox.com.au/in-the-field-video-photographing-the-together-panorama/

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A beautiful sunflower in the early morning light. Captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia

Sunflowers

Well a very Happy New Year to you all. For me the start of any new year is a great time not only for a well deserved break, but a great time to reflect on the previous 12 months and have a bit of a mental review of how I saw my photography progress. The main aim of this is to work out my direction for 2019 and I’ve set myself a nice challenge as a result. I’m very happy with how my Astro photography has progressed. My weather photography is in a lull due to simply there being no storms so I’m concentrating on my landscape photography.

I’ve set myself a challenge to only shoot panoramic landscapes in the 3:1 format for 2019. Oh I’ll still get the odd normal 4:3 framed photo, but purely for Instagram. Any dedicated landscape photograph I capture in 2019 is going to be a panorama. Why? Well several reasons. I love to follow other photographers works and over the years I’ve come to admire two photographers in particular. Ken Duncan and Mark Grey, both incredibly successful Australian landscape photographers. Ken has been at it for Decades, Mark is relatively new to the scene, both having extraordinary success. It’s more than that however, it’s the resulting photographs they get. There is something about an amazingly well captured panorama that draws you in. The photograph when seen large envelopes your entire field of view, you are put into the scene with the photographer at the moment of capture.

This is what I want to explore and it actually means relearning a whole lot about photography. Composition is different by necessity as the frame is now very different and balance, viewpoint, elements all come into play in different ways.

So my journey into this field has begun and I find it very exciting. To kick off the new year with a bang I met up with my great friend Craig and we headed west to areas near Toowoomba in search of Sunflowers as word is out, they are blooming.

PLEASE NOTE : I won’t disclose the exact location of this farm at the farmers request. However, if you are looking for Sunflowers the area of Clifton on the Darling Downs between Warwick and Toowoomba has them in flower right now.

Thankfully Craig has scouted this location only the day before, also gaining us permission from the farmer to access the land fully, simply awesome work mate. 3:30am saw us standing in the back of the ute, Tripods at the ready, watching the light slowly appear. This first panorama was captured around 15 minutes before sunrise, the high cloud getting hit with the awesome colours of the approaching sunrise, that light also reflecting down onto the sunflowers. My composition here was to be very simple. Lines leading you through the fields.

An amazing Panorama of Dawn over the Sunflowers near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer Murray Fox
Sunflower Dawn 

Next it was time to really head into the fields. Another section of this farm has a great windmill surrounded by Sunflowers, well how could we resist photographing that? This field was full of bees making their merry way from flower to flower, and we did take the time out here to really just soak up the atmosphere, work our compositions and try different things.

An amazing Panorama of a classing windmill surrounded by sunflowers near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer Murray Fox
Sunflower Windmill 

Capturing panoramas is a bit of a challenge. The hardest part I find is framing. As you are stitching together multiple photographs to take one large one, you can’t see the final result in the field. Specialist panorama cameras exist but are far beyond my budget so this is my option in order to get the best quality and result. So far I’ve worked out that by setting the height of my view and ensuring I capture 5-6 photographs across I can usually get pretty close to the result I’m after with minimal loss of pixels in post production on the computer.

This final panorama was the only time the sun actually fell directly on the flowers. We had stopped to have a chat with the property owner when the sun broke through, but only on the ground, the sky was not being directly affected, awesome light! Excusing myself for a minute, I quickly setup and captured this image of the farmers old parents house, now not lived in but still maintained, which is surrounded by the wonderful sunflowers, not a bad view in my books. I think this is my favourite from the morning and I know my wife agrees with me.

An amazing Panorama of a farmhouse surrounded by sunflowers near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer Murray Fox
Sunflower Farmhouse available as a Limited Edition Acrylic Print. Click photo for further information.

I’ve found I’m quickly falling in love with the panorama format for both the challenge and the results. The quality end result I’m getting allows me to print a 60inch wide x 20inch high photograph at full 300dpi resolution (no loss of quality at all). I love to see my photographs purchased and hanging on peoples walls. Panoramas seem to lend themselves perfectly to being displayed, they work well in many different styles of rooms in peoples homes and in businesses. That’s my end game as a photographer, while I love taking photographs, and sharing them with the world, to create images that people love enough to hang in their own home to me is the ultimate.

So I’ll keep working at it, continuing to find new subjects in amazing conditions and share them with all of you. If I can get a nice portfolio of maybe 20 photographs by the end of 2019 I’ll be in heaven, and maybe a few of you will have such a connection with my work that you’ll want to own a copy for yourselves.

Finally, a quick single photo I took “doing it for the gram”. This will be up on my Instagram Feed.

A beautiful sunflower in the early morning light. Captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia
A beautiful sunflower in the early morning light.

Thank you everyone for following along with my photography for 2018, I really look forward to what 2019 is going to bring. I think the photographs will be released a bit slower, but the quality should be another level higher as I continue to learn and challenge myself.

Murray

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Stunning Dead Trees captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

A morning with Black & White Film – Vlog & Photos

On this morning I loaded up my Mamiya 1000s 645 medium format camera with a roll of Fuji Acros 100 Black and White film. Now sadly discontinued, this is a beautiful fine grain film that I find perfect for landscapes.

I’ve posted a full video of the morning on my facebook page, please be sure to watch, comment, like and share.

Below are the photos from the video in detail for you to view. I developed the film myself at home using R09 Adinol which is a modern version of Rodinal. Using a semi stand development time of 18 minutes and 30 seconds. I then scanned the photos into my computer using an Epson V550, did some clean up of dust and final tweaking in photoshop and done.

This first photograph, I love the sidelight coming across the scene. It’s a simple rural view that could be anywhere.

Tracking through the hills captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

With this next one, I love the contrast between the tree and the sky. I’m going to have to invest in some orange and red filters I think, they would really make the blue in the sky pop out as well.

A lone tree captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I just love this photo of the sprayers. I had a vision when I saw this scene and it came out exactly as I hoped. Minimal depth of field, gives such a cool feeling to a simply but great scene.

Fresh crops being sprayed captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I cropped this next one to a panorama, the whole view just looked amazing to me, light breaking through in patches, cloud hugging the top of the range. Being medium format film, I can still print this huge with a good scan, some things Digital can’t fully compete with yet, for the same cost at least.

Stunning Panorama of the Scenic Rim captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I love love love this one, printing it now, wall hanger. Just waiting for the light to come across, checking my exposure every time it did change, the anticipation, and then nailing the shot, but you don’t know it until the film is developed, dried and scanned…wow, what a rush. Really nothing more to say about my thoughts on this one 🙂

An amazing view of a Peak in the Scenic Rim captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

Another one for the wall, again, it came out exactly how I hoped. Mind you, I thought I’d lose detail in the trees. Nope! The film captured the full dynamic range of the scene, blew my mind.

Stunning Dead Trees captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I always love a walk through Purga reserve, it’s such an interesting place and doesn’t take long to get through but you can spend hours here checking it all out.

The boardwalk at Purga Reserve captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

And the last shot of the morning, again, it came out exactly as I hoped, really minimal focus area, light making the fallen tree pop. Happy.

A fallen tree captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I’m so happy with the results from this morning. These photographs look amazing, I’ll be printing out a couple of these for my wall at home, if you’d like to purchase a copy for yourself, simply contact me and we’ll make it happen.

Again, thanks for watching and reading!

Murray

 

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