Tag: rim

A stunning rural sunrise in South East Queensland Australia near Boonah in the Scenic Rim captured by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox

Rural Sunrise

I’m a very technical photographer. I tend to research a lot before venturing into the field and sometimes you can focus on these things too much, rather than just getting out there and taking photos. This weekend was a little like that. I had a photograph in mind that I wanted to capture. Wyaralong Dam in the Scenic Rim can be stunning if you get the right sky.

Friday afternoon and there were high clouds north, but they needed to come south a few hundred kilometres in order to be where I wanted them. 10pm, I’m watching the sky, I ended up being so fixated on it I was still awake at 3am, the time I would have to leave if I wanted to get a photo, but the clouds never came so I finally slept, thinking about the photograph I haven’t captured yet.

Saturday night I took a different tack, I ignored the clouds, I got my gear ready to go, set my alarm for 3am and slept. Waking up and walking out the door, the clouds looked like they had potential, but regardless, I was going to go. Worse case this would be a good practice session to work towards mastering panoramas.

Arriving at the dam it was still dark but light would approach soon. I spent a good 30 minutes working out a composition, checking my settings, checking the tripod was level, and taking a few test series of shots. The light came through it’s various stages, from nice blue hour, to the pinks and reds of sunrise. However I had a problem. A bank of low cloud had moved across and was breaking up the great high clouds that had the colour. The end result was a bust, but I learnt a lot and was happy with that.

On the drive home, the sun had broken over the distant hills finally, some fast moving fog was rolling between the hills. Coming up over the rise of one hill I hit the brakes and quickly pulled over. The scene looked fantastic to me, the beautiful orange of golden hour was glowing across the sky and ground. Thankfully my gear was pretty much ready to go, put camera on tripod, level, focus and shoot.

A photo like this takes a long time to edit on post for me. Why? Because it’s 2 rows of  8 photographs, that is 16 full size photographs merged to one gigantic image. This will print MASSIVE and I think will look fantastic on anyone’s wall that loves a view like this. I’ve learnt that shooting two rows allows me to get more of either the sky or ground in the photograph (com-positional choice / ground for this one) and that really gives this photograph a great sense of depth. At full resolution you can see the cows feeding in the morning light way down the hill, the detail is amazing.

So my lessons this week are don’t sweat it so much, just make sure you get out there and shoot. This was a completely random location and it was about being there when the light was good, and finding a scene to suit.

Let me know what you think about this photograph in the comments below, I always love feedback good or bad. Until next time, stay safe and thank you very much for reading.

A stunning rural sunrise in South East Queensland Australia near Boonah in the Scenic Rim captured by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox
Click to find out how to get your own copy of this photograph for your wall as an amazing Acrylic Print.

Olympus OMD Em5.2, Olympus 45mm. F8, ISO 200, 1/200 sec. 2 Rows of 8 Photographs

I’ve added this to my Landscape Portfolio that will gradually all become panoramas as I move towards the format, which I just love.

Murray

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Stunning Dead Trees captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

A morning with Black & White Film – Vlog & Photos

On this morning I loaded up my Mamiya 1000s 645 medium format camera with a roll of Fuji Acros 100 Black and White film. Now sadly discontinued, this is a beautiful fine grain film that I find perfect for landscapes.

I’ve posted a full video of the morning on my facebook page, please be sure to watch, comment, like and share.

Below are the photos from the video in detail for you to view. I developed the film myself at home using R09 Adinol which is a modern version of Rodinal. Using a semi stand development time of 18 minutes and 30 seconds. I then scanned the photos into my computer using an Epson V550, did some clean up of dust and final tweaking in photoshop and done.

This first photograph, I love the sidelight coming across the scene. It’s a simple rural view that could be anywhere.

Tracking through the hills captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

With this next one, I love the contrast between the tree and the sky. I’m going to have to invest in some orange and red filters I think, they would really make the blue in the sky pop out as well.

A lone tree captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I just love this photo of the sprayers. I had a vision when I saw this scene and it came out exactly as I hoped. Minimal depth of field, gives such a cool feeling to a simply but great scene.

Fresh crops being sprayed captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I cropped this next one to a panorama, the whole view just looked amazing to me, light breaking through in patches, cloud hugging the top of the range. Being medium format film, I can still print this huge with a good scan, some things Digital can’t fully compete with yet, for the same cost at least.

Stunning Panorama of the Scenic Rim captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I love love love this one, printing it now, wall hanger. Just waiting for the light to come across, checking my exposure every time it did change, the anticipation, and then nailing the shot, but you don’t know it until the film is developed, dried and scanned…wow, what a rush. Really nothing more to say about my thoughts on this one 🙂

An amazing view of a Peak in the Scenic Rim captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

Another one for the wall, again, it came out exactly how I hoped. Mind you, I thought I’d lose detail in the trees. Nope! The film captured the full dynamic range of the scene, blew my mind.

Stunning Dead Trees captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I always love a walk through Purga reserve, it’s such an interesting place and doesn’t take long to get through but you can spend hours here checking it all out.

The boardwalk at Purga Reserve captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

And the last shot of the morning, again, it came out exactly as I hoped, really minimal focus area, light making the fallen tree pop. Happy.

A fallen tree captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I’m so happy with the results from this morning. These photographs look amazing, I’ll be printing out a couple of these for my wall at home, if you’d like to purchase a copy for yourself, simply contact me and we’ll make it happen.

Again, thanks for watching and reading!

Murray

 

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A simply amazing and super saturated sunrise over Moreton Bay at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane Queensland Australia captured on a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film

Seascapes, Landscapes, Night Photography, The Wonder of Ektar 100 Film

Well another roll of Kodak Ektar 100 Film in 120 Medium format done and dusted. I was very much looking forward to seeing how the shots on this roll came out. I actually had quite a variety of shoots on this one, a few photos I bracketed, or forgot to lock the mirror up and retook and one I completely stuffed it up by setting the shutter speed wrong..and still managed a recoverable shot, blew my mind! With my Mamiya 645 Medium format camera I get 15 shots per roll and with this one I got 6 photos I absolutely love and a few others that came out nice as well. I think it’s my best hit rate to date on film.

Starting with an overnight stay up at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane for my wedding anniversary back in October, I took the opportunity for an early start to capture sunrise over the water. I was really looking for just simple compositions here, nothing fancy at all. My thoughts at the time was if I got a good one, I’ll have it printed and matted and send it to my Parents as a gift, they have very much an ocean theme through their house.

This first shot was captured well before sunrise, when the first colour of dawn was hitting the sky. I used a 2 stop Graduated ND filter to keep the brightness of the sky close to the water. Those colours were just amazing, but I could have exposed a little bit longer to get more detail into the rocks.

A stunning dawn over Moreton Bay at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane Queensland Australia captured on a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 45mm Lens, Kodak Ektar 100 Film 120 Format

Next I waited around until the sun actually rose. There was some great cloud around the horizon and it was filtering the sun, throwing out colour. Again I used the 2 stop hard grad ND filter, exposed for the water and just let the Ektar 100 film do it’s thing. It has an amazing ability to get so much detail into the highlights even if they are many many stops brighter. I really liked how this one came out, and those colours, wow! Pretty sure I’ll be sending this one to Mum & Dad for Christmas. I’ve added this photograph to my Landscapes Portfolio, it’s simple, but I really like it.

A simply amazing and super saturated sunrise over Moreton Bay at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane Queensland Australia captured on a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 45mm, Ektar 100

Next it was time to head back to the country. This time I was experimenting with time of day, a different lens here and there. This next photograph was over some corn almost ready to harvest near Kalbar in the Scenic Rim. I used the Mamiya 80mm lens at F4 (think I will try F2.8 next time) to focus only on the closest corn and let everything behind fade into blur. It kinda worked but not 100% the result I was aiming for, I think my biggest issue was I was too low, need to get higher and show the depth in there to give that blur a more noticeable effect. Still, the early morning side light was wonderful and I like how peaceful this photograph feels.

Beautiful morning light across a cornfield near Kalbar in the scenic rim of Queensland Australia captured on medium format Mamiya 645 camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 80mm, Ektar 100

This next one was the same morning but during dawn and I think is my favourite photo from this roll. I was really hoping for clouds, but now the film is developed and I see those colours, wow! Eye popping stuff. Kodak Ektar 100 is a very saturated film, and I’m finding the dawn light, before the sun gets up, has slightly lower contrast, but simply amazing colour results. Definitely need to shoot more at this time of day with this film. Again I used a 2 stop ND grad to control the brightness of the sky, this was around a 90 second exposure at f/16. I’ve added this to my Landscapes Portfolio. This location is Kents Lagoon north of Kalbar in the scenic rim of South East Queensland Australia. I’m standing on quite an old, single lane wooden bridge to get this photo, praying the locals all decided to sleep in so I wouldn’t have to run off the bridge with my gear, and then set it all up again! 🙂 Except for one fella plowing his field, I was car free for an hour thankfully.

Stunning dawn colours looking up Kents Lagoon near Kalbar in the scenic rim of Queensland Australia, captured using a Mamiya 645 medium format camera on Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, 45mm, Ektar 100

Finally I decided to try this film at night. The results were good, at least my metering was right and I didn’t stuff up the photos lol! That’s the hardest part, you have no idea of you got it right, so you check, double check, check again, think about taking the shot, wait for a car to move that just pulled up, start again in case the light changed. Honestly, I loved every minute of it, it’s so much fun, and you really REALLY slow down and think about every press of that shutter button. All of that happened with this first one, but finally everything was clear and the shot taken. This is a pub not far from home, right next to the highway at Haigslea. Very happy with how much latitude I captured between the dark shadows and the bright highlights. I think I need to revisit this one, maybe with some Portra 160 film which has a much more soft pastel pallet, and do it at sunset for some colour and go wider with the view.

The Sundown Saloon Haighslea west of Ipswich Queensland Australia captured at night on a medium format Mamiya 645 camera with Kodak Etkar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, 80mm, Ektar 100

Finally I dropped into Marburg just up the road the same night. The post office there is very quaint and I quite liked the look of it at night. I had to shoot a fairly tight crop to avoid the parked vehicles from the pub goers. Again, I used the 80mm, around f/11 to keep some depth of field. Ended up being around a 80 second exposure. I just love the bail of hay out the front, really lets you know this ain’t no city post office!

The Post Office at Marburg west of Ipswich Queensland Australia captured at night on a medium format Mamiya 645 camera with Kodak Etkar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, 80mm, Ektar 100

I’m going to get my hands on some Cinestill 800T film soon, that stuff looks just amazing for night city and architecture photographs, it blooms around light sources with a super interesting colour pallet.

I’ve got plenty of film in the fridge now to shoot. This roll was really about trying different things and gaining confidence with the equipment and the results. I’m extremely happy with how it all went, and I can quite confidently now go out and shoot on film and not be too concerned with the results as long as I remember to do all the steps. It’s a very manual process, and I absolutely love it. Looking forward to doing some more black and white film soon too.

Let me know in the comments below which is your favourite shot!

Thank you so much for reading and getting to this point, I really really appreciate it. Follow me on Facebook and Instagram to keep up to date, and visit again soon. I sell all of my photographs as Fine Art Prints, Canvas prints and Prints on either Acrylic or Metal, if you’d like one for yourself, simply contact me and I’ll send you pricing details.

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An amazing view of the core of the milky way rising over a windmill in the rural countryside near Ipswich Queensland Australia as captured by Award winning Landscape storm and weather photographer Murray Fox

Windmill Core

The moon has gone again this weekend and there wasn’t a cloud in the sky for 300ks. The temperature was forecast to be the lowest so far this year (around 5 degrees C in town, more like 2 degrees in the countryside). It looked like a perfect night for some more astro photography. With a slight breeze, everything stayed perfectly dry, no condensation whatsoever.

I caught up with my friend and after packing a few supplies (Picnic chocolate bars and Ice Coffee…yes Ice lol!) we headed out to a location I knew, but had not visited recently. I had word that a new windmill had been erected here and it looked like it was going to be in good alignment with the rising core of the Milkyway. With Mt Walker to the east of it, I thought I could get a really nice backdrop.

Arriving on sight we spent 10 minutes walking around looking at the angles. We noticed that we had a couple of problems to deal with. The first one as the core was not north enough to really put Mt Walker into the framing I wanted with the angle of lens I was using. The big one was the head of the windmill was facing almost due south, making it extremely hard to get a good view of it, and the core.

You can see from this first photograph the layout of the scene and one of my first attempts at seeing what result I could get. Mt Walker is to the left and there just wasn’t a workable angle.

A great view of Mt Walker at night with the core of the milky way rising over a windmill in this pure Australian Night time landscape photograph captured near Ipswich Queensland Australia by Award winning landscape weather storm photographer Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm Pro, F/2.8, 15 seconds, ISO 5000

Never one to give up, and we had a good hour window of shooting before the core was too high in the scene. I kept moving around working angles. Around 80 photos later (and they are all long exposures) I found I really liked this composition. Going vertical to really show the height of the Windmill, the core almost comes blasting out of it. And to top it off there were meteorites regularly dropping across they sky.

The peak of those is next weekend, it was great to see some real fireballs this night. I switched to a 20mm f.17 prime lens for this shot allowing a shorter shutter time (less noise) and a wider aperture (more light). This more zoomed in lens also enlarges the size of the core compared to the foreground, really bringing it into view. This also really captured the colours in the stars. The windmill and ground were illuminated with a torch my friend held to the side of the scene, painting over it with very quick movements. The slight breeze was enough to cause the windmill to turn, and I like the blurring effect during the long exposure, gives a nice sense of movement. The flat top of Mt Walker in the background is just enough in frame here to add some interest and give a sense of location.

An amazing view of the core of the milky way rising over a windmill in the rural countryside near Ipswich Queensland Australia as captured by Award winning Landscape storm and weather photographer Murray Fox
ISO 3200, 8 seconds, 20mm, F/1.7

This photograph has been added to my Astro Nightscapes gallery, really flowing well with my recent captures.

Here is a list of the gear I use. These are affiliate links, by following them and making a purchase you help support my photography at no extra cost to yourself.

* Camera : Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mk II Body Only – Silver
* Canon FD to M43rd Adapter : K&F Concept Lens Mount Adapter for Canon FD Lens to Micro 4/3 Cameras
* My Goto Landscape Lens : Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 12-40mm f2.8 PRO Black Len
* My Favourite Tripod : ZOMEi Z818C Carbon Fiber Camera Tripod With Quick Release Plate and Ball Head (Blue)
* Best Budget Filters Ever : Zomei 10 in 1 Square Z-PRO Series Filter Kit
* Best Budget Portrait Lens Made! : Olympus M.ZUIKO Digital ED 45mm F1.8 (Black) Lens
* The Perfect Walkaround Lens : Panasonic 20mm F/1.7 Pancake Lens
* A great CPL for your 12-40mm : Manfrotto MFESSCPL-62 62 mm Essential Circular Polarizer Filter
* The Best Aftermarket Battery Kit : DSTE 2X BLN-1 Battery + DC133 Travel and Car Charger Adapter

All of my photographs are available for purchase as Fine Art Prints in A2 and A3 size, as well as ready to hang Canvas Prints. Just contact me for pricing.

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Stunning sunrise from Govenors Chair Lookout at Spicers Gap overlooking the Fassifern Valley in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photography Murray Fox

Govenors Chair Sunrise

This morning was a sunrise meet up for the Scenic Rim Photo Walks group and the plan was to shoot sunrise from a fantastic location. Govenors Chair lookout has a stunning view over Mt Greville and the Fassifern valley. The plan was to arrive around an hour before sunrise which was just after 6am. Being around an hours drive from home, my tired brain set my alarm for 4:40am…uh oh. A quick race out and thankfully no traffic, I was just in time for sunrise. The early colour lit the clouds nicely but I was looking for the light after the sun rose.

Fog was nestled in locations throughout the valley, and there was a lovely haze in the air that just lit up with the morning glow of the sun when it broke through the clouds. This first photograph was looking south east, encompasing a wider view and showing the magnificent gradations of light and colour on the landscape, I absolutely love light like this and this photo shows why. Mind the step tho, that is a straight drop off at the end of the rock! You must practice extreme care photographing here.

Stunning sunrise from Govenors Chair Lookout at Spicers Gap overlooking the Fassifern Valley in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photography Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm, ISO 100, F/10, 1/500 Sec, 2 Stop Grad ND Filter

I also had my Lubitel medium format film camera with me. My first go at shooting colour film, I spent a lot of time metering and taking shots of various compositions as the light changed. I’ll have that roll back in a week or so, very excited to see what results I got, hopefully the exposure is okay because the colour should be amazing.

In between taking film shots, I took a more intimate photograph of Mt Greville. This is a beautiful peak from any direction and lies at the southern end of Lake Moogerah. The way the haze was lighting up the mountain, and the layers of the hills below me created beautiful steps of light that lead into the photograph. I composed this in portrait orientation to get as much of the hills below me in the shot while zoomed in a bit to really capture the size of Mt Greville. Let me know in the comments what you think of this photograph.

Mt Greville in the Scenic Rim of South East Queensland Australia at sunrise, viewed from Govenors Chair Lookout at Spicers Gap with stunning orange colours and light streaming through the landscape by Award Winning Australian Landscape Photography Murray Fox
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, ISO 100, F/10, 1/800 sec

It was a great morning, lovely to catch up with everyone on the photo walk. They are held monthly, I suggest checking the site out and coming along to a walk if you are in the area, it’s a great way to explore and see things you don’t normally see.

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A beautiful old tractor sits in the paddock as the core of the milky way lights up the sky above it near Kalbar and Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia south of Ipswich.

Kicking off Milkyway Season with a Bang!

With clear skies at night, not too cold and not too warm, conditions were absolutely perfect to chase some Milky Way photographs. It would mean a couple of late nights as the core only started to rise around 11pm, with peak time 1-2am however it certainly was worth it.

During the off season I’ve been watching a lot of videos and reading up on various techniques used by the best of the best when it comes to night time and astro photography. I had a head full of new ideas, which included changes to how I worked in the field capturing the images, as well as how I post processed the photos back on the computer.

Now I’ll be very up front about this, none of these photographs are a single image. It’s possible to do, however I don’t believe you can get the quality of file, increase of detail and control of noise in a single image, that you can get with multiple exposures. Some people get their knickers in a knot if it isn’t a single photograph, it doesn’t bother me in the slightest. My simple goal was to create an image of the vision in my head, using any tools and methods I could.

I met up with a very good friend and we decided to head south of Ipswich towards the rural farming areas. I knew of a couple of barns and other items that could make for a very interesting foreground, and hopefully would line up with the Milky Way behind them. I simply cannot pick which photograph is my favourite.

First stop was a barn and god was with us as it was full to the brim of bales. The sky here is so dark you can easily see the Milky Way with your eyes and that makes framing a since. I setup my gear, firmly locked down my tripod and focused on the stars (Olympus is amazing in that you can use focus peaking on the stars, just pick a bright one and it’s done). I proceeded to capture 8 photographs at ISO 5000, F/2.8, 15 seconds per exposure, at 12mm (equivalent to 24mm on a full frame camera. The 15 seconds ensures no star movement for pinpoint lights. I really racked up the ISO as I knew I would be stacking in and that will significantly reduce noise.

Once the sky shots were done, the fun began. I switched my camera to Live Composite mode, dropped the ISO to 400 for a lot cleaner file, and let it start. I used a torch to light paint the barn, first from the left side until the exposure was where I wanted it, then added a little fill from the right to soften the shadows.

All of this was stacked, blended, merged etc in Photoshop, there are some great videos on youtube about how to do this. And here is the final result!

An amazing night time photograph of a barn full of hay bales, beautiful illuminated with the core of the milky way rising behind it near Kalbar and Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia south of Ipswich.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm Pro, Multiple Exposures

Next we moved on down the road to where I had previously seen a tractor. Not knowing it was still there, I was very thankful I had spotlights on my 4wd to help light up the sides of the road, otherwise I may have missed it.

For this photograph the techniques used on the barn would be the same. This time I had to set the camera lower and closer, trying to fill the frame with as much of the tractor as possible, but still allowing room for the Milky Way around it. We could hear a pump running out in the field and before long, the Farmer who owns this land was out on his bike in the dark (stuffed if I know how he didn’t hit something!) checking his sprayers. He dropped over to say G’day (and check what we were doing). He was off to bed for a few hours nap before getting up to check the sprayers again. Life can be gruelling for a farmer, they all have my utmost respect.

Again, I captured 8 images for the sky and one light painted one for the tractor and ground. I always recommend painting from both sides to even out the light a little.

A beautiful old tractor sits in the paddock as the core of the milky way lights up the sky above it near Kalbar and Boonah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia south of Ipswich.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm Pro, Multiple Exposures

There was one more photograph I had envisaged to capture before heading out this night, and that was of some beautiful crop lights with the Milky Way over them. Unfortunately it looks like I missed out by one day as all the fields had been just harvested. I’ll just have to wait until later in the season to get that photograph. So instead we took a drive back into Peaks Crossing where you have a clear view of Flinders Peak to the east. By this time (2am) the core was at a nice height in the sky. Again I captured 8 images to stack for the sky, and used my torch to paint in the foreground. On a clear night light this, if you are staying in an area with pretty much the same light pollution levels, you rarely need to change your settings, allowing you to spend much more time on the important things like composition and spooking yourself in the dark.

A stunning view of the core of the milky way as it rises over Flinders Peak near Peak Crossing in the Scenic Rim south of Ipswich, Queensland, Australia
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, 12-40mm Pro, Multiple Exposures

Finally as a bonus, I had headed out the night before this to South Ripley to do a test run of my settings, post techniques etc. I captured this photograph. I think it’s came out a bit dark, ISO used for the sky was 3200, which is why I upped to 5000 for the next night. Practice pays.

A beautiful clear night at South Ripley, near Ipswich Queensland Australia as the core of the milky way rises over the farmland.
Olympus OMD Em5 Mark 2, 12-40mm Pro, Multiple Exposures

As the season progresses, I’ll be doing a lot more astro photography. Thank you for reading.

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Mt Moon in the Scenic Rim south of Boonah in Queensland Australia. Beautiful Dawn light as sunrise approaches, amazing purples and blues in the sky, cloud across the peak and mist laying low on the ground. Australia Day 2018 landscape photography

Australia Day Sunrise 2018 – Just amazing!

I’m always on the lookout for new locations to photograph. Finding those locations and then getting access to them can be tricky here in South East Queensland. We have a lot of rural areas, farms, parks etc that limit just how close you can get to the view you want.

Lately I’ve been interested in shooting more panoramas, last week I caught a great sunset over Lake Moogerah, this week I wanted more of a mountain shot. Scouting around I found a great peak south of Boonah called Mt Moon. it’s slightly off the main road so I’d never really paid attention to it. Google maps showed it could work very well for a panorama, with a couple of challenges to overcome.

First, you couldn’t get that close, I’d have to shoot from the edge of the road around 2-3ks distant. So I figured I’d have to zoom in and decided I’d use the Olympus 45mm f/1.8 prime lens in portrait mode. This lens is fantastically sharp, and stopped down a bit it would easily get all the scene I required in focus as the subject was a good distance away. I also figured I would shoot in the hi-resolution mode of my Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II to give me massive files with a huge amount of detail, and little to no noise. I would need approx 6 vertical shots across the scene to capture the width needed to get a final 3:1 panorama. I would be shooting with the sun (sunrise directly behind me) so it would be a fairly low contrast photograph which would suit the mood I was thinking of.

Arriving on location I picked the spot which would give me the panorama of Mt Moon that I wanted, however I was very soon distracted by the amazing light and colour coming up from behind me as sunrise approached. I simply couldn’t resist capturing a photograph of it and as you’ll see in the video, that colour just kept coming and coming.

Amazing colour in the sky as sunrise approaches the scenic rim near Mt Moon south of Boonah, Queensland, Australia
CLICK TO VIEW LARGE 13sec, f/5.0, ISO 200, Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, Olympus 12-40mm Pro @ 22mm

I was hoping that I could get colour in the sky above the peak, and that first direct orange glow of light hitting the peak itself. As usual nature decides to do it differently and when there was colour in the sky, the light was okay on the peak, lower clouds blocked the direct golden light I was planning on. However, the pre dawn colours turned out to be amazing, throwing up 360 degrees of amazing skies.

There was fog low to the ground in front of Mt Moon that kept coming and going, and some wonderful cloud around the peak. I took many series of shots, trying to time it so that I had both where they looked good. Finally, the reverse sunrise sky turned an amazing shade of purple with wisps of pinks through it. Here is the final photograph, Mt Moon Panorama :

Mt Moon in the Scenic Rim south of Boonah in Queensland Australia. Beautiful Dawn light as sunrise approaches, amazing purples and blues in the sky, cloud across the peak and mist laying low on the ground. Australia Day 2018 landscape photography
CLICK TO VIEW LARGE 1/8sec, f/5.0, ISO 200, Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II, Olympus 45mm f/1.8 Lens, Six Shot Panoroama hires mode.

I’m very happy with the final result. The golden hour colour didn’t happen until much later after sunrise, and by that time the colour had all gone from the sky. In the future I may have to work on a bit of a time blend to see if I can put together best best of both parts of sunrise. I did head up the road a little way to a wonderful old abandoned farmhouse and captured the golden hour light shining through. The square crop worked very well for this and this is a perfect photo for my Instagram account.

An abandoned farm house is bathed in golden hour light as the sun breaks through the trees at sunrise, near Mt Moon, south of Boonah in the Scenic Rim Queensland Australia
CLICK TO VIEW LARGE 1/200sec, f/8.0, ISO 200, Olympus Omd Em5 Mark ii, Olympus 45mm f/1.8 lens

Finally, I’ve created a behind the scenes video of this morning, going into some of my setup in more detail, and just displaying some of the amazing light that happened on this wonderful Australia Day 2018.

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Beautiful star trail over Lake Moogerah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia with great colour from the last of sunset and blue hour over the mountains.

Early evening star trails over Lake Moogerah

At a recent meet up with the great folks from Scenic Rim Photo Walks I hung around after sunset to capture this great photograph.

Beautiful star trail over Lake Moogerah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia with great colour from the last of sunset and blue hour over the mountains.

To capture this photograph was actually quite simple thanks to the great technology in my Olympus OMD Em5 Mark II camera. I framed up the photograph in portrait orientation. I set the aperture to f/5.6 for good depth of field, and set the ISO at 400. I’ve found this to be the perfect ISO for my camera at night time where I want to keep detail/colour in the stars during trails.

Next I enabled the Live Composite function of my camera. This awesome feature will capture a photograph at your set exposure, and then update that exposure with only new light every time the shutter speed is reached. So for this one I set the shutter at 10 seconds. So every 10 seconds the camera updated the photo with only new light (in this case the stars), while keeping the rest of the exposure perfect. I ran this for 30 minutes and loved the final result.

Starting the composite when I did while there was still a touch of colour in the sky worked out great, it’s the first time I’ve tried that. The stars also retained some great colour as they trailed, and I even managed to capture a couple of meteorites as seen on this zoomed in view.


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A stunning sunset over Lake Moogerah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia. This panorama shows the beautiful wide view of the dead trees in the water, with Mt Greville looming in the background. The sky is full of colour and the ripples of the water reflects this wonderfully.

Lake Moogerah Sunset Panorama

G’Day everyone. With the family all off to see Mamma Mia the musical, I ended up with a free afternoon. There was a meetup for the Scenic Rim Photo Walks group at Lake Moogerah, so all the gear was packed and off I set for the hours drive south to the dam.

It was a very hot and warm day, many people were taking advantage of the lake with jet skiers and water skiers zipping around. The clouds was starting to look very good as sunset approach, but the wind in the main part of the lake was still very strong, it didn’t look like I was going to get one of those perfect reflections.



I decided to head around to the southern part of the lake as it appeared the wind was a little less strong there. Driving down to the waters edge it looked like I was right, it wasn’t a mirror finish, but the ripples were nice and I figured that if there was colour for sunset, this could work.

I walked the shoreline trying to visualise for a panorama, not something I do often so its a little hard to get your head around. I ended up using my phone to take photos, and then crop them in phone to a rough 3:1 aspect ratio to help work out my composition. There were two stumps close to shore, I liked those and wanted them as my foreground interest. Two sets of taller trees on each side of the mountain could work as a nice framing element. After about 20 minutes of moving around I settled on my spot.

I had my tripod as low as it could go, I also had the camera mounted on a nodal point setup in portrait orientation. This basically allows the camera to rotate around the best part of the lens, so when you get back to stitching together the shots, you have very minimal loss of pixels, worked out great. The hardest part is to make sure your tripod is dead level.

I zoomed in to 34mm on my Olympus 12-40mm pro (equivalent to 68mm on a full frame camera). I wanted to bring all the elements of the scene closer to each other. When you are standing there, that mountain really looms over you and with a wide angle, that feeling would have been lost. I put the camera in full manual mode, ISO at my lowest which is 200, Aperture at F9 which gave me just enough depth of field being zoomed in (take a few test shots and check the sharpness on the back of the camera to get this right). I was also going to bracket my exposures as with such a high peak, using a filter would have darkened it down too much for my liking. My camera is the Olympus OMD, Em5 Mark II.

Now it was just a matter of sitting back and waiting. Sunset here in South East Queensland Australia can be a very funny thing, you will get waves of colours and just when you think it’s all over, another blast comes through. After witnessing at least 2 bursts of colour that didn’t light up the scene well, I thought this may end up a dud sunset, but I knew I something could happen so I just waited.

Suddenly the cloud to the right started getting a hint of red, and within 30 seconds it was glowing. I took my shots from right to left (starting where best colour was). 6 vertical shots overall to capture the width of the scene I wanted, 3 exposures for each shot at metered exposure, 2 stops under and 2 stops over. I ditched the underexposed photos as my metered captured the sky perfectly. Here are the final 12 exposures I would work with.

These are the initial exposures I will use to blend, stitch and then post process to create my Moogerah Sunset Panorama.

The colour finally finished so I made my way back to the day use area to meet back up with the group. I captured a great star trail shot which I’ll share up next week with the details on that one.

Post processing this image was going to be a lot of work and I actually had several goes at it. I finally decided to exposure blend the metered photo and the 2 stop over exposed photo from each shot, to bring back some of the detail in the darker parts of the middle ground. This involved taking both photos into Photoshop and using luminosity masks to blend. I finally ended up with these 6 photos ready for stitching to a panorama and then post processing.

These are the photos I will stitch together and then post process to create my Moogerah Sunset Panorama

Now the post processing begins. I created the panorama in Photoshop and then began my adjustments. I did some colour correction to get the colours to where I remembered them. I then used Nik filters to boost the contrast and colours. A final round of sharpening and I was very happy with the result. The final image ended up at 40inches wide at 300dpi, I’ll certainly be able to print this very big.

A stunning sunset over Lake Moogerah in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia. This panorama shows the beautiful wide view of the dead trees in the water, with Mt Greville looming in the background. The sky is full of colour and the ripples of the water reflects this wonderfully.

I really enjoyed the process of capturing this panorama, and I’m starting to learn how to visualise the shot. I’m looking forward to repeating this process more this year, keep an eye out!

Be sure to visit regularly, follow me on Facebook or Twitter where I’ll post links to each new blog post as it happens, also follow me on Instagram where I post up my photographs, and My Story will have lots of behind the scenes photos and videos.

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An amazing storm with stacked layers in the clouds looms over a barn illuminated by light with flinders peak mountain in the background. Captured Christmas day 2017 at Peaks Crossing between Ipswich and Boonah in South East Queenland Australia.

Happy New Year for 2018

A very Happy New Year to you all. I’m kicking off the year with a big emphasis on my photography and this website. My blog is now re-invigorated, I’ll be posting about my latest editions to my portfolios, about recent photograph shoots, trips and tricks, and giving you an insight into the behind the scenes of my work.

Christmas day was a real winner for me, a late afternoon storm saw me out south of Ipswich looking at this marvellous cloud formation. As luck would have it I had the perfect scene to compliment the photo. I’m sure you’ll agree it’s a perfect addition to my fine art storm portfolio. Check the full story and photograph here : BARN or click on the photograph below.

An amazing storm with stacked layers in the clouds looms over a barn illuminated by light with flinders peak mountain in the background. Captured Christmas day 2017 at Peaks Crossing between Ipswich and Boonah in South East Queenland Australia.

 

Be sure to visit regularly, follow me on Facebook or Twitter where I’ll post links to each new blog post as it happens, also follow me on Instagram where I post up my photographs, and My Story will have lots of behind the scenes photos and videos.



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