Tag: scenic

Australian Landscape Photography - Murray Fox -Bundamba Lagoon, Ipswich, Queensland, Australia at sunrise on Kodak Portra 160 4x5 Large Format Film by Australian Landscape Photographer Murray Fox

My colour 4×5 large format film Journey begins – Lagoon Sunrise

Bundamba Lagoon, Ipswich, Queensland at sunrise, photographed by Queensland Landscape Photographer Murray Fox based in Australia on Large Format 4x5 Film Kodak Portra 160.

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Australian Landscape Photography - Murray Fox The chair at the top of Mt French in the Scenic Rim of Queensland Australia near Boonah as photographed on a Crown Graphic 4x5 film camera using Kodak Tmax 100 by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox

The next step – Large Format Photography

I was fortunate enough to come across a great deal and as an end result I am now the happy owner of a 50+ something year old Crown Graphic 4×5 camera. Simplicity itself to use, it’s basically a light tight box with a lens attached and a ground glass at the back for framing and focusing. It does have some other dohickies to help with that as well but I want to keep everything simple.

This camera takes 4inch x 5inch sheet film (HUGE!) or I can also use 120 Medium format film with a rear attachment for 8 shots in 6cm x 9cm size (again, still massive). This gives me the best of both worlds really. I can shoot 6×9 and keep costs down and go for the 4×5 when only the best quality will do.

Currently I’m only geared up to do 4×5 in black and white, but will be working to get colour home development sorted in the next month or so, then I will probably shoot more 4×5 than anything else.

Why 4×5? There are several things really that I wanted. One, is huge size/great quality, you get this in spades with the negatives. You also shoot one at a time and can change between different films on the fly as long as you have them loaded in a holder. A lot harder to do with medium format where you must finish the current roll, or carry multiple (and expensive) backs.

You can develop 1 photo at a time, especially nice with black and white as you can then do neat tricks with developing to change the end result/contrast etc.

The other is movements. This is a biggie for me. Out of the box with the 90mm lens my Crown Graphic has, movements are pretty limited, some rise, tilt upwards and shift left right. What I really wanted was lens tilt forward, this really helps with landscapes to get close focus and distant focus all in the same shot, while keeping everything parallel. Only cameras with movements or very expensive shift lenses can do this.

A quick modification to the front standard (reversing it) and I now have lens tilt forward along with rise, just perfect for landscapes. The rest of my kit is pretty budget, I’m just using an old black short as a dark cloth, and I have 5 holders (10 shots), more than enough really as I only plan to shoot 1 to 2 photos each time I go out. So 2 shots b&w and 2 shots colour loaded.

Well it was time to go and play so an early start saw me at the top of Mt French, getting slightly wet from the odd shower, and cursing the lack of the real light I wanted. Note, I also had not reversed the front standard yet, it was only after developing this photo I realised I really needed front tilt for focus control.

Anyway, there is a great spot in the middle of the heather where you can sit and chill. With the slightly gloomy conditions I just knew that black and white was the way to go. I had 2 sheets of Kodak Tmax 100 loaded and I exposed both, one as I metered and 1 a bit over exposed. I then developed both at home using the same time and went with the negative I was happiest with, which was the normal exposure. A good learning experience.

The level of detail in the photo blows me away, zoomed in you can see the individual rain drops on the chair and all the branches, leaves, rocks etc have wonderful textures. I even like the focus fall off into the distance even tho I really wanted it all sharp.

I also captured a few 6×9 frames in Kodak Ektar 100, a wonderful colour film, looking the other way from this view over the heather and nearby mountain. Those will have to wait for another day as I’ve not yet finished that roll, the joys of film 🙂

For anyone wondering why do all this, film is dead etc, go visit Alex Bourke. Alex is my inspiration in 4×5 photography, his images are just outstanding and he teaches a lot. I’ve purchased his Ebooks and regularly read them and his knowledge works. If I can get photos of Australia half as good as his USA photos, I’ll be in heaven.

Until next time, take care!

Murray

A stunning sunset over sunflowers at Mt Walker in Ipswich and the Scenic Rim of Queenland Australia looking west over the great dividing range. A panorama wall art / fine art photograph captured by Australian Landscape and Weather photographer Murray Fox

Sunflower Sunset

Well wasn’t this a challenge! My self and my good friend Craig had been in contact with a local farmer. He advised us his sunflowers were in their prime so we arranged a visit for Sunday afternoon to shoot it through sunset.

The massive problem was Tropical Cyclone Oma was approaching through the week and ended up sitting off the coast for a few days. The rain didn’t happen but boy did we get the wind. Capturing a stitched panoramic photograph can be challenging at anytime, throw in very strong winds with a close subject that moves around a lot, add just a sprinkle of low light as sunset occurs and I almost didn’t get a shot.

Thankfully, my previous experience with panoramas this year is really paying off and the final result, well, not blowing my own horn here but wow! This is the best panorama I’ve captured so far.

Timing was a bit rushed too as we first did a quick portrait shoot for the lovely couple who own the property, always great to give something back for being graciously granted permission onto their property. I’ve photographed in this area for nearly 10 years now and never have I captured a sunset with such a wonderful view as this.

Post production putting the final image together was also a super challenge. I ended up spending well over 5 hours putting all the pieces together and checking pretty much down to each flower everything joined up correctly. Hard work, but well worth the results.

Hopefully the rains come soon, everyone needs a drop so much.

A stunning sunset over sunflowers at Mt Walker in Ipswich and the Scenic Rim of Queenland Australia looking west over the great dividing range. A panorama wall art / fine art photograph captured by Australian Landscape and Weather photographer Murray Fox

I’m doing a bit more portrait work lately, it’s a change from the normal and being the obsessive technical type, a great challenge with lots of new things to learn. My first love is still landscapes and now panoramas however, so I may even explore the possibility of combining the two for something truly unique, stay tuned!

I’ve added this photograph to my Landscape Portfolio, and you may click here to find out more information about purchasing this photograph as a Limited Edition Acrylic Print.

A stunning rural sunrise in South East Queensland Australia near Boonah in the Scenic Rim captured by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox

Rural Sunrise

I’m a very technical photographer. I tend to research a lot before venturing into the field and sometimes you can focus on these things too much, rather than just getting out there and taking photos. This weekend was a little like that. I had a photograph in mind that I wanted to capture. Wyaralong Dam in the Scenic Rim can be stunning if you get the right sky.

Friday afternoon and there were high clouds north, but they needed to come south a few hundred kilometres in order to be where I wanted them. 10pm, I’m watching the sky, I ended up being so fixated on it I was still awake at 3am, the time I would have to leave if I wanted to get a photo, but the clouds never came so I finally slept, thinking about the photograph I haven’t captured yet.

Saturday night I took a different tack, I ignored the clouds, I got my gear ready to go, set my alarm for 3am and slept. Waking up and walking out the door, the clouds looked like they had potential, but regardless, I was going to go. Worse case this would be a good practice session to work towards mastering panoramas.

Arriving at the dam it was still dark but light would approach soon. I spent a good 30 minutes working out a composition, checking my settings, checking the tripod was level, and taking a few test series of shots. The light came through it’s various stages, from nice blue hour, to the pinks and reds of sunrise. However I had a problem. A bank of low cloud had moved across and was breaking up the great high clouds that had the colour. The end result was a bust, but I learnt a lot and was happy with that.

On the drive home, the sun had broken over the distant hills finally, some fast moving fog was rolling between the hills. Coming up over the rise of one hill I hit the brakes and quickly pulled over. The scene looked fantastic to me, the beautiful orange of golden hour was glowing across the sky and ground. Thankfully my gear was pretty much ready to go, put camera on tripod, level, focus and shoot.

A photo like this takes a long time to edit on post for me. Why? Because it’s 2 rows of  8 photographs, that is 16 full size photographs merged to one gigantic image. This will print MASSIVE and I think will look fantastic on anyone’s wall that loves a view like this. I’ve learnt that shooting two rows allows me to get more of either the sky or ground in the photograph (com-positional choice / ground for this one) and that really gives this photograph a great sense of depth. At full resolution you can see the cows feeding in the morning light way down the hill, the detail is amazing.

So my lessons this week are don’t sweat it so much, just make sure you get out there and shoot. This was a completely random location and it was about being there when the light was good, and finding a scene to suit.

Let me know what you think about this photograph in the comments below, I always love feedback good or bad. Until next time, stay safe and thank you very much for reading.

A stunning rural sunrise in South East Queensland Australia near Boonah in the Scenic Rim captured by Australian Landscape photographer Murray Fox
Click to find out how to get your own copy of this photograph for your wall as an amazing Acrylic Print.

Olympus OMD Em5.2, Olympus 45mm. F8, ISO 200, 1/200 sec. 2 Rows of 8 Photographs

I’ve added this to my Landscape Portfolio that will gradually all become panoramas as I move towards the format, which I just love.

Murray

A beautiful sunflower in the early morning light. Captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia

Sunflowers

Well a very Happy New Year to you all. For me the start of any new year is a great time not only for a well deserved break, but a great time to reflect on the previous 12 months and have a bit of a mental review of how I saw my photography progress. The main aim of this is to work out my direction for 2019 and I’ve set myself a nice challenge as a result. I’m very happy with how my Astro photography has progressed. My weather photography is in a lull due to simply there being no storms so I’m concentrating on my landscape photography.

I’ve set myself a challenge to only shoot panoramic landscapes in the 3:1 format for 2019. Oh I’ll still get the odd normal 4:3 framed photo, but purely for Instagram. Any dedicated landscape photograph I capture in 2019 is going to be a panorama. Why? Well several reasons. I love to follow other photographers works and over the years I’ve come to admire two photographers in particular. Ken Duncan and Mark Grey, both incredibly successful Australian landscape photographers. Ken has been at it for Decades, Mark is relatively new to the scene, both having extraordinary success. It’s more than that however, it’s the resulting photographs they get. There is something about an amazingly well captured panorama that draws you in. The photograph when seen large envelopes your entire field of view, you are put into the scene with the photographer at the moment of capture.

This is what I want to explore and it actually means relearning a whole lot about photography. Composition is different by necessity as the frame is now very different and balance, viewpoint, elements all come into play in different ways.

So my journey into this field has begun and I find it very exciting. To kick off the new year with a bang I met up with my great friend Craig and we headed west to areas near Toowoomba in search of Sunflowers as word is out, they are blooming.

PLEASE NOTE : I won’t disclose the exact location of this farm at the farmers request. However, if you are looking for Sunflowers the area of Clifton on the Darling Downs between Warwick and Toowoomba has them in flower right now.

Thankfully Craig has scouted this location only the day before, also gaining us permission from the farmer to access the land fully, simply awesome work mate. 3:30am saw us standing in the back of the ute, Tripods at the ready, watching the light slowly appear. This first panorama was captured around 15 minutes before sunrise, the high cloud getting hit with the awesome colours of the approaching sunrise, that light also reflecting down onto the sunflowers. My composition here was to be very simple. Lines leading you through the fields.

An amazing Panorama of Dawn over the Sunflowers near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer Murray Fox
Sunflower Dawn 

Next it was time to really head into the fields. Another section of this farm has a great windmill surrounded by Sunflowers, well how could we resist photographing that? This field was full of bees making their merry way from flower to flower, and we did take the time out here to really just soak up the atmosphere, work our compositions and try different things.

An amazing Panorama of a classing windmill surrounded by sunflowers near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer Murray Fox
Sunflower Windmill 

Capturing panoramas is a bit of a challenge. The hardest part I find is framing. As you are stitching together multiple photographs to take one large one, you can’t see the final result in the field. Specialist panorama cameras exist but are far beyond my budget so this is my option in order to get the best quality and result. So far I’ve worked out that by setting the height of my view and ensuring I capture 5-6 photographs across I can usually get pretty close to the result I’m after with minimal loss of pixels in post production on the computer.

This final panorama was the only time the sun actually fell directly on the flowers. We had stopped to have a chat with the property owner when the sun broke through, but only on the ground, the sky was not being directly affected, awesome light! Excusing myself for a minute, I quickly setup and captured this image of the farmers old parents house, now not lived in but still maintained, which is surrounded by the wonderful sunflowers, not a bad view in my books. I think this is my favourite from the morning and I know my wife agrees with me.

An amazing Panorama of a farmhouse surrounded by sunflowers near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer Murray Fox
Sunflower Farmhouse available as a Limited Edition Acrylic Print. Click photo for further information.

I’ve found I’m quickly falling in love with the panorama format for both the challenge and the results. The quality end result I’m getting allows me to print a 60inch wide x 20inch high photograph at full 300dpi resolution (no loss of quality at all). I love to see my photographs purchased and hanging on peoples walls. Panoramas seem to lend themselves perfectly to being displayed, they work well in many different styles of rooms in peoples homes and in businesses. That’s my end game as a photographer, while I love taking photographs, and sharing them with the world, to create images that people love enough to hang in their own home to me is the ultimate.

So I’ll keep working at it, continuing to find new subjects in amazing conditions and share them with all of you. If I can get a nice portfolio of maybe 20 photographs by the end of 2019 I’ll be in heaven, and maybe a few of you will have such a connection with my work that you’ll want to own a copy for yourselves.

Finally, a quick single photo I took “doing it for the gram”. This will be up on my Instagram Feed.

A beautiful sunflower in the early morning light. Captured by Australian Landscape, Storm & Weather photographer near Toowoomba on the Darling Downs of Queensland Australia
A beautiful sunflower in the early morning light.

Thank you everyone for following along with my photography for 2018, I really look forward to what 2019 is going to bring. I think the photographs will be released a bit slower, but the quality should be another level higher as I continue to learn and challenge myself.

Murray

Stunning Dead Trees captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

A morning with Black & White Film – Vlog & Photos

On this morning I loaded up my Mamiya 1000s 645 medium format camera with a roll of Fuji Acros 100 Black and White film. Now sadly discontinued, this is a beautiful fine grain film that I find perfect for landscapes.

I’ve posted a full video of the morning on my facebook page, please be sure to watch, comment, like and share.

Below are the photos from the video in detail for you to view. I developed the film myself at home using R09 Adinol which is a modern version of Rodinal. Using a semi stand development time of 18 minutes and 30 seconds. I then scanned the photos into my computer using an Epson V550, did some clean up of dust and final tweaking in photoshop and done.

This first photograph, I love the sidelight coming across the scene. It’s a simple rural view that could be anywhere.

Tracking through the hills captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

With this next one, I love the contrast between the tree and the sky. I’m going to have to invest in some orange and red filters I think, they would really make the blue in the sky pop out as well.

A lone tree captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I just love this photo of the sprayers. I had a vision when I saw this scene and it came out exactly as I hoped. Minimal depth of field, gives such a cool feeling to a simply but great scene.

Fresh crops being sprayed captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I cropped this next one to a panorama, the whole view just looked amazing to me, light breaking through in patches, cloud hugging the top of the range. Being medium format film, I can still print this huge with a good scan, some things Digital can’t fully compete with yet, for the same cost at least.

Stunning Panorama of the Scenic Rim captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I love love love this one, printing it now, wall hanger. Just waiting for the light to come across, checking my exposure every time it did change, the anticipation, and then nailing the shot, but you don’t know it until the film is developed, dried and scanned…wow, what a rush. Really nothing more to say about my thoughts on this one 🙂

An amazing view of a Peak in the Scenic Rim captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

Another one for the wall, again, it came out exactly how I hoped. Mind you, I thought I’d lose detail in the trees. Nope! The film captured the full dynamic range of the scene, blew my mind.

Stunning Dead Trees captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I always love a walk through Purga reserve, it’s such an interesting place and doesn’t take long to get through but you can spend hours here checking it all out.

The boardwalk at Purga Reserve captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

And the last shot of the morning, again, it came out exactly as I hoped, really minimal focus area, light making the fallen tree pop. Happy.

A fallen tree captured on Fuji Acros 100 Black and White Medium Format Film using a Mamiya 645 1000s Camera by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox in the Ipswich and Scenic Rim Area of Queensland Australia

I’m so happy with the results from this morning. These photographs look amazing, I’ll be printing out a couple of these for my wall at home, if you’d like to purchase a copy for yourself, simply contact me and we’ll make it happen.

Again, thanks for watching and reading!

Murray

 

A simply amazing and super saturated sunrise over Moreton Bay at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane Queensland Australia captured on a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film

Seascapes, Landscapes, Night Photography, The Wonder of Ektar 100 Film

Well another roll of Kodak Ektar 100 Film in 120 Medium format done and dusted. I was very much looking forward to seeing how the shots on this roll came out. I actually had quite a variety of shoots on this one, a few photos I bracketed, or forgot to lock the mirror up and retook and one I completely stuffed it up by setting the shutter speed wrong..and still managed a recoverable shot, blew my mind! With my Mamiya 645 Medium format camera I get 15 shots per roll and with this one I got 6 photos I absolutely love and a few others that came out nice as well. I think it’s my best hit rate to date on film.

Starting with an overnight stay up at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane for my wedding anniversary back in October, I took the opportunity for an early start to capture sunrise over the water. I was really looking for just simple compositions here, nothing fancy at all. My thoughts at the time was if I got a good one, I’ll have it printed and matted and send it to my Parents as a gift, they have very much an ocean theme through their house.

This first shot was captured well before sunrise, when the first colour of dawn was hitting the sky. I used a 2 stop Graduated ND filter to keep the brightness of the sky close to the water. Those colours were just amazing, but I could have exposed a little bit longer to get more detail into the rocks.

A stunning dawn over Moreton Bay at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane Queensland Australia captured on a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 45mm Lens, Kodak Ektar 100 Film 120 Format

Next I waited around until the sun actually rose. There was some great cloud around the horizon and it was filtering the sun, throwing out colour. Again I used the 2 stop hard grad ND filter, exposed for the water and just let the Ektar 100 film do it’s thing. It has an amazing ability to get so much detail into the highlights even if they are many many stops brighter. I really liked how this one came out, and those colours, wow! Pretty sure I’ll be sending this one to Mum & Dad for Christmas. I’ve added this photograph to my Landscapes Portfolio, it’s simple, but I really like it.

A simply amazing and super saturated sunrise over Moreton Bay at Redcliffe Peninsula north of Brisbane Queensland Australia captured on a Mamiya 645 Medium Format Film camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 45mm, Ektar 100

Next it was time to head back to the country. This time I was experimenting with time of day, a different lens here and there. This next photograph was over some corn almost ready to harvest near Kalbar in the Scenic Rim. I used the Mamiya 80mm lens at F4 (think I will try F2.8 next time) to focus only on the closest corn and let everything behind fade into blur. It kinda worked but not 100% the result I was aiming for, I think my biggest issue was I was too low, need to get higher and show the depth in there to give that blur a more noticeable effect. Still, the early morning side light was wonderful and I like how peaceful this photograph feels.

Beautiful morning light across a cornfield near Kalbar in the scenic rim of Queensland Australia captured on medium format Mamiya 645 camera and Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, Mamiya 80mm, Ektar 100

This next one was the same morning but during dawn and I think is my favourite photo from this roll. I was really hoping for clouds, but now the film is developed and I see those colours, wow! Eye popping stuff. Kodak Ektar 100 is a very saturated film, and I’m finding the dawn light, before the sun gets up, has slightly lower contrast, but simply amazing colour results. Definitely need to shoot more at this time of day with this film. Again I used a 2 stop ND grad to control the brightness of the sky, this was around a 90 second exposure at f/16. I’ve added this to my Landscapes Portfolio. This location is Kents Lagoon north of Kalbar in the scenic rim of South East Queensland Australia. I’m standing on quite an old, single lane wooden bridge to get this photo, praying the locals all decided to sleep in so I wouldn’t have to run off the bridge with my gear, and then set it all up again! 🙂 Except for one fella plowing his field, I was car free for an hour thankfully.

Stunning dawn colours looking up Kents Lagoon near Kalbar in the scenic rim of Queensland Australia, captured using a Mamiya 645 medium format camera on Kodak Ektar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather Photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, 45mm, Ektar 100

Finally I decided to try this film at night. The results were good, at least my metering was right and I didn’t stuff up the photos lol! That’s the hardest part, you have no idea of you got it right, so you check, double check, check again, think about taking the shot, wait for a car to move that just pulled up, start again in case the light changed. Honestly, I loved every minute of it, it’s so much fun, and you really REALLY slow down and think about every press of that shutter button. All of that happened with this first one, but finally everything was clear and the shot taken. This is a pub not far from home, right next to the highway at Haigslea. Very happy with how much latitude I captured between the dark shadows and the bright highlights. I think I need to revisit this one, maybe with some Portra 160 film which has a much more soft pastel pallet, and do it at sunset for some colour and go wider with the view.

The Sundown Saloon Haighslea west of Ipswich Queensland Australia captured at night on a medium format Mamiya 645 camera with Kodak Etkar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, 80mm, Ektar 100

Finally I dropped into Marburg just up the road the same night. The post office there is very quaint and I quite liked the look of it at night. I had to shoot a fairly tight crop to avoid the parked vehicles from the pub goers. Again, I used the 80mm, around f/11 to keep some depth of field. Ended up being around a 80 second exposure. I just love the bail of hay out the front, really lets you know this ain’t no city post office!

The Post Office at Marburg west of Ipswich Queensland Australia captured at night on a medium format Mamiya 645 camera with Kodak Etkar 100 film by Australian Landscape, Storm and Weather photographer Murray Fox
Mamiya 645, 80mm, Ektar 100

I’m going to get my hands on some Cinestill 800T film soon, that stuff looks just amazing for night city and architecture photographs, it blooms around light sources with a super interesting colour pallet.

I’ve got plenty of film in the fridge now to shoot. This roll was really about trying different things and gaining confidence with the equipment and the results. I’m extremely happy with how it all went, and I can quite confidently now go out and shoot on film and not be too concerned with the results as long as I remember to do all the steps. It’s a very manual process, and I absolutely love it. Looking forward to doing some more black and white film soon too.

Let me know in the comments below which is your favourite shot!

Thank you so much for reading and getting to this point, I really really appreciate it. Follow me on Facebook and Instagram to keep up to date, and visit again soon. I sell all of my photographs as Fine Art Prints, Canvas prints and Prints on either Acrylic or Metal, if you’d like one for yourself, simply contact me and I’ll send you pricing details.